The Ecumenical Future: Background Papers for in One Body through the Cross : the Princeton Proposal for Christian Unity

The Ecumenical Future: Background Papers for in One Body through the Cross : the Princeton Proposal for Christian Unity

The Ecumenical Future: Background Papers for in One Body through the Cross : the Princeton Proposal for Christian Unity

The Ecumenical Future: Background Papers for in One Body through the Cross : the Princeton Proposal for Christian Unity

Synopsis

Early in 2003 a group of sixteen theologians from various church traditions published "In One Body through the Cross," a landmark statement on the present state and future possibilities of modern ecumenism. In order to help readers understand the true depth of that document, also known as The Princeton Proposal, "The Ecumenical Future" makes available the scholarly studies that stand behind it. According to the editors of this timely volume, the perception is widespread that the ecumenical train is stalling or has even run off the tracks. In spite of significant gains in understanding between Catholics, Orthodox, and various Protestant denominations, the church's present divisions are nothing less than a scandal. The fourteen essays in this book represent a focused examination of the issues that still divide and of the common ground still to be discovered.

Excerpt

After the Second Vatican Council expectations ran high that the many ecumenical dialogues that followed would succeed in placing the major blocs of world Christianity on converging paths. The concept of the church as a communion (koinonia) of churches seemed to offer hope for the ecumenical movement to reach its goal of church unity. Pope John Paul II placed the highest priority on reconciliation between the Eastern and Western branches of Christianity. The dialogues succeeded not only in changing attitudes of Christians toward one another, but also in producing interchurch agreements with far-reaching implications. The Leuenberg Agreement had brought Lutheran and Reformed Churches into closer fellowship in Europe and around the world. The Joint Declaration on the Doctrine of Justification was signed by the Vatican and the Lutheran World Federation, stating that the mutual condemnations of the Reformation period are no longer church-dividing. The Called to Common Mission, accepted by the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Episcopal Church USA, is an agreement resulting in full communion and shared ministries. These, along with many similar ones, are the fruits of the many interdenominational dialogues that changed the ecclesial landscape also in North America.

Yet, in spite of these significant gains the perception is widespread that the ecumenical train is stalling or has even run off the tracks. Churches have cut back on their financial support to ecumenical organizations. The official ecumenical councils of churches are struggling to become more inclusive of Evangelical and Pentecostal communities that have . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.