The Morality of Adoption: Social-Psychological, Theological, and Legal Perspectives

The Morality of Adoption: Social-Psychological, Theological, and Legal Perspectives

The Morality of Adoption: Social-Psychological, Theological, and Legal Perspectives

The Morality of Adoption: Social-Psychological, Theological, and Legal Perspectives

Synopsis

The Religion, Marriage, and Family Series investigates marriage and family as major theological and cultural issues. Given that both society and the church have debated these topics intensely but have actually studied them very little, this series attempts to correct recent theological neglect of these important matters.

Excerpt

“Separated At Birth In Mexico, United At Campuses On Long Island” — so reads the full-page headline of the New York Times’ “New York Report” for Monday, March 3, 2003. The remarkable story beneath the banner tells of how Tamara Rabi and Adriana Scott, twin girls from Guadalajara adopted by different families at birth, ended up meeting each other as college students in New York twenty years later. Tamara had been raised Jewish in an apartment in Manhattan, while Adriana had been brought up Roman Catholic in a house on Long Island; Tamara was attending Hofstra, while Adriana was enrolled at Adelphi. Neither woman knew that her twin sister existed until a mutual friend noted the striking physical and biographical resemblances and made the connection. The twins’ first contact was by e-mail, and their first meeting in person was in a McDonald’s parking lot. Though different in interesting ways, they immediately hit it off.

The social and ethical complexities of this story make it a ready emblem for contemporary American adoption. Indeed, the unpredictable “happy ending” for all concerned makes it a very positive emblem, a showcase for religious and ethnic goodwill within the diverse (yet apparently small) American melting pot. But there are, of course, more straightforward and less satisfying adoption (and nonadoption) outcomes.

“Agency Admits Errors in Fatal Case of Abused Boy” — so reads the

1. “Separated at Birth in Mexico, United at Campuses on Long Island,” New York Times, 3 Mar. 2003, Sec. A, p. 25.

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