Social Equity and the Funding of Community Policing

Social Equity and the Funding of Community Policing

Social Equity and the Funding of Community Policing

Social Equity and the Funding of Community Policing

Synopsis

Gutierrez examines the solicitation, granting, and use of Community Oriented Policing (COP) Funds in 197 municipalities. He discusses how disproportionately poor, crime-ridden cities did in comparison to prosperous, safe cities with regard to COP funds and whether COP funding was used to help build bridges for police-community relations in cities with high levels of diversity. His results, assessing the ability of different cities to get federal money and then the effectiveness of that money, are important when analyzing publicly funded changes in local law enforcement.

Excerpt

When I decided that a social equity oriented policy impact study of the community policing program administered by the federal government would be an important contribution to scholarship on contemporary law enforcement, I first became intrigued by the way money for this project was being allocated, as it was the largest federal subsidy of record. Reaching close to a decade of testing the waters, I also became interested in the changes in the organization as well. Pulling together resources available from the 1990 Census, the Uniform Crime Reports, multiple years of Law Enforcement Management and Administrative Statistics (LEMAS) data, and information available from the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (OCOPS). However good the idea may have been, compiling data from these diverse reports makes for a large data set.

When thinking about the evolution of policing, it is important to consider the social, political, and organizational variables that bring about change in the law enforcement profession. The level of impact a particular major reform policy has and whether it meets the goals and objectives of intended change are of concern to legislators, planners, administrators, and citizens alike.

This analysis of social equity and the solicitation and granting of federal funds will examine how police agencies have changed in lieu of the receipt of these funds authorized by the 1994 Federal Crime Bill championed by the Clinton administration. In the first part of the study, an analysis of the recent history of federal funding aimed at improving law enforcement capabilities will be examined. Being the first major federal subsidy of law enforcement in recent history, the Law Enforcement Assistance Administration funding program will be examined in some detail. Next, the community oriented policing (COP) movement will be analyzed by detailing the types of programs subsidized by the 1994 Crime Bill funding, their original intent, and . . .

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