Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities

Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities

Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities

Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities

Synopsis

Human trafficking is a crime that undermines fundamental human rights and a broader sense of global order. It is an atrocity that transcends borders-with some regions known as exporters of trafficking victims and others recognized as destination countries. Edited by three global experts and composed of the work of an esteemed panel of contributors, Human Trafficking: Exploring the International Nature, Concerns, and Complexities examines techniques used to protect and support victims of trafficking as well as strategies for prosecution of offenders.Topics discussed include: How data on human trafficking should be collected and analyzed, and how data collection can be improved through proper contextualization The importance of harmonization and consistency in legal definitions and interpretations within and among regions The need for increased exchange of information and cooperation between the various actors involved in combating human trafficking, including investigators, law enforcement and criminal justice professionals, and social workers Problems with victim identification, as well as erroneous assumptions of the scope of victimization Controversy over linking protection measures with cooperation with authorities Highlighting the issues most addressed by contemporary scholars, researchers, practitioners, and policy-makers, this volume also suggests areas ripe for further inquiry and investigation. Supplemented by discussion questions in each chapter, the book is sure to stimulate debate on a troubling phenomenon.

Excerpt

It has only been a little more than a decade since the international community committed to confront what Kevin Bales (2007), and Kara (2009), among others, have referred to as modern-day slavery (the “oldest oppression”), with the landmark adoption of the United Nations’ Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons on November 15, 2000. In response to this milestone international treaty, a growing number of countries have enacted, or amended, their laws and policies to prosecute human traffickers, provide assistance and protection to trafficked persons, and to prevent this criminal activity that undermines fundamental human rights and a broader sense of global order. Meanwhile, 2010 marked the 10th anniversary of the Trafficking in Persons (TIP) Report compiled by the U.S. Department of State, a key document in the fight against modern day slavery.

Alongside this international community response, numerous countries have taken important steps to make important contributions to intervene on behalf of trafficked persons and advocate for enhanced measures to provide its victims with various types of support (e.g., rehabilitation and reintegration services) (see Chapter 12). At the same time, academic researchers and scholars have sought to enhance the understanding of both the nature and extent of trafficking in persons involved in sexual exploitation and forced labor at a national, regional, and global levels as well as providing evidence-based research to support more effective public policy responses. While both pure research and action-based research continue to be of ongoing importance, interest has grown, in recent years, in how to improve our assessment of the laws, policies and programs, as well as the pedagogical perspectives of human trafficking that have been implemented to combat/ understand trafficking in persons. This evaluative goal is an important one, both to ensure that responses are indeed achieving their objectives as well as for the identification of promising practices.

This handbook represents another contribution to a recently burgeoning body of (academic) literature on the complex problem of human trafficking . . .

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