Juvenile Justice Administration

Juvenile Justice Administration

Juvenile Justice Administration

Juvenile Justice Administration

Synopsis

An effective administrator must not only have the educational background to understand the foundational basis for the system, but must also be guided by the vision and mission of the organization. Juvenile Justice Administration illustrates through examples and interviews with juvenile justice administrators and other personnel how these organizations and agencies function and provides a comparative analysis of juvenile justice systems across countries and continents.Using a plethora of case studies to demonstrate the issues presented, the book examines: The historical origins and goals of the juvenile justice system The tasks performed by juvenile justice administrators Management theories and administrative models such as the human relations approach, the social systems approach, and organizational models Juvenile justice personnel and administrative agencies serving endangered children Laws pertaining to juvenile offenders and children at risk Police and juvenile justice issues in the United States, Canada, Japan, Austria, and South Africa Probation, parole, community-based sanctions, and correctional facilities for juvenile offenders The book also explores future trends in juvenile justice administration. As the system increasingly shifts from a punishment-oriented model to a restorative justice approach, this book provides administrators with sufficient background on the topic as well as insight into innovative policies and procedures that may prove advantageous to their communities.

Excerpt

When I heard that this book on juvenile justice administration was being prepared, I readily agreed to write this foreword because I have long recognized the key role administrators, managers, and supervisors play in the success of juvenile justice functions. Having served as a judge with the Stark County Family Court for more than 18 years, and as the senior judge of that court for more than six years, I realize how important it is to have personnel who are working together as a team to accomplish the mission and specific goals of the court. As judges, we can set goals for the court that we want to achieve, but it is up to the court administrator, the heads of the various departments, and the line workers to actually accomplish these goals through their day-to-day operations.

Are leaders who have obtained a high degree of success using talents that are inherent to their personalities, or have they reached this degree of expertise through training and experience? This is a not a question that calls for an either-or answer. Those in leadership positions, to be effective, must utilize their personal traits and experiences, yet they also must be nimble enough to set aside these same traits in favor of evidence-based best practices learned through training and experience. In other words, sometimes the very personal traits that help one become a leader stand in the way of actually leading. An effective leader must constantly be developing and honing many skills. These include planning, organizing, staffing, innovating, budgeting, coordinating, and communicating. Communication is listed last not because of its relative importance. In fact, communication on all levels of an organization is perhaps the most important of all. As in any relationship from marital to business to social, ineffective communication leads directly to disaster. In our court, the Stark County Family Court, we conducted an extensive employee diversity training program some years ago with the goal to sensitize ourselves to the needs of the diverse population we serve as well as those of our diverse staff. That goal was achieved, and the diversity training was a great success. The real success of that process, however, was that it became an overarching performance evaluation of our court, including that of our leadership, philosophy, mission and vision, and the way we do business. A general observation that came out of the diversity training was that the way we communicated was deficient. As a result, many specific programs to improve communication, both internal and external, were developed and these programs are still being implemented successfully to this day.

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