Contemporary North Korea: A Guide to Economic and Political Developments

Contemporary North Korea: A Guide to Economic and Political Developments

Contemporary North Korea: A Guide to Economic and Political Developments

Contemporary North Korea: A Guide to Economic and Political Developments

Synopsis

This book provides full details of contemporary economic and political developments in North Korea since late 2005, continuing the overview of developments which were covered in the author's North Korea: A Guide to Economic and Political Developments (Routledge 2006). Key topics covered include: the succession; family visits; human rights; nuclear capability and intentions; recent initiatives in international relations, and relations with the United States; and adverse economic and social conditions.

Overall, the book demonstrates the degree to which North Korea's international position is changing. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the current political and economic situation in North Korea today, and is an important resource for all those interested in this country's recent development.

Excerpt

‘Jeffries ends his book in late 2005 … Jeffries’ book is an invaluable resource to any scholar of North Korea’s political, diplomatic and economic development after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Although it does not attempt to provide answers as to why events occurred as they did, it will be an indispensable source for any effort to do so’ (Christopher Griffin, Pacific Affairs, 2007, vol. 80, no. 3, pp. 531–3).

I was delighted with this generous comment about North Korea: A Guide to Economic and Political Developments (Routledge 2006) by Christopher Griffin of the American Enterprise Institute in Washington DC. This is what I was trying to achieve and I can only hope that this companion volume, covering events thereafter, finds equal favour with readers.

Key political events

Criticisms of the policies of US President George W. Bush, estimates
of the number of nuclear weapons and the Khan network

I served as an ‘on-site monitor’ under the 1994 United States–North Korean
nuclear agreement known as the Agreed Framework … In 1994 the situ
ation with North Korea had become so fraught that the Clinton administra
tion was considering military strikes to prevent North Korea from extracting
plutonium from spent fuel at Yongbyon. At the time North Korea might
have had enough plutonium, produced in 1989, to build one or two nuclear
devices. The fuel being discharged contained enough plutonium for five or
six additional weapons. Last-ditch talks between former President Jimmy
Carter and President Kim Il Sung of North Korea defused the crisis and led
to the framework. The deal, which helped us avoid a military conflict, froze
Pyongyang’s plutonium programme; eventually it could have led to North
Korea abandoning its nuclear efforts in exchange for diplomatic recognition
by the United States and economic incentives. In 2002, however, American
intelligence agencies confirmed that North Korea was trying to acquire a
uranium enrichment programme in violation of the deal. But instead of
working within the framework to get the North to abandon its nuclear

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