Bisexuality and Same-Sex Marriage

Bisexuality and Same-Sex Marriage

Bisexuality and Same-Sex Marriage

Bisexuality and Same-Sex Marriage

Synopsis

In our society, the argument for or against same-sex marriage becomes even more heated when the debate turns to bisexual women and men. Bisexuality and Same-Sex Marriage thoughtfully explores this debate from a wide range of interdisciplinary perspectives, presenting respected scholars from fields as diverse as American Studies, Communication, Criminology, Human and Organizational Systems, Law and Social Policy, LGBT Studies, Organizational Behavior, Psychology, Sociology, Women s Studies, and Queer Studies. This clear-viewed volume is organized into three perspectives theoretical, research, and personal that frame the debate from a macro to micro level of analysis.
This book goes beyond the intense acrimony and divisiveness to rationally examine the issue from various viewpoints and through the latest research. This informative text presents and analyzes in depth the current findings and the diverse LGBT and straight perspectives on the issue. This insightful resource discusses in detail personal views, the latest theories, and is extensively referenced.

Bisexuality and Same-Sex Marriage is an essential volume for LGBT studies professionals, psychologists, counselors, educators, students, and interested general public.

This book was published as a special issue of the Journal of Bisexuality.

Excerpt

In all of the public and academic debate about same-sex marriage and marriage equality, bisexuality has been invisible or marginalized at best, and demonized at worst. This volume was conceptualized as a way to allow for thoughtful and deliberate discourse on bisexuality and bisexual experience as it informs, and is informed by, the same-sex marriage debate. The resulting interdisciplinary volume includes scholars from diverse fields representing American Studies, Communication, Criminology, Human and Organizational Systems, Law and Social Policy, LGBT Studies, Organizational Behavior, Psychology, Sociology, Women’s Studies, and Queer Studies. Contributing authors approach the topic of bisexuality and same-sex marriage from three distinct perspectives (theoretical perspectives, research perspectives, and personal perspectives). This volume, then, is organized into three corresponding sections that frame the debate from a macro to micro level of analysis. Although different in scope, the three articles that comprise this section frame bisexuality in the same-sex marriage debate within a given theoretical context. Taken together these works reveal the ways in which existing frameworks are constrained by dichotomized notions of sex, gender, and sexual orientation and how the discourse and language shift within the same-sex marriage debate when bisexual existence and experience is acknowledged. In “Supremacy by Law: The One Man One Woman Marriage Requirement and Antimiscengenation Law,” Jacqueline Batterlora analyzes the legal arguments against same-sex marriage (Defense of Marriage Act and Federal Marriage Amendment) in the context of antimiscengenation law. Interestingly, Battalora considers the ways in which the conceptualization of bisexuality parallels multiracial (part-White) identities in legal definitions and restrictions of marriage. Danielle Antoinette Hidalgo, Kristen Barber, and Erica Hunter in “The Dyadic Imaginary: Troubling the Perception of Love as Dyadic,” deconstruct the dyadic assumptions used in social science research regarding definitions of love, intimacy, sexuality and kinship. Their analysis reveals the ways in the same-sex marriage debate fails these dyadic assumptions and continues to reinforce dichotomized notions of sex, gender, and sexual orientation.
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.