Managing Self-Harm: Psychological Perspectives

Managing Self-Harm: Psychological Perspectives

Managing Self-Harm: Psychological Perspectives

Managing Self-Harm: Psychological Perspectives

Synopsis

Self-harm often arises at moments of despair or emotional intensity, and its reasons are not necessarily available to the conscious mind. Managing Self-Harmexplores the meaning and impact of self-harm, and the sense in which it is a language of the body. It is designed to help clinicians, people who self-harm and their families and carers to understand its causes, meaning and treatment.

Each chapter integrates theory with clinical illustration, enabling the direct experiences of those who self-harm to be heard and reflecting the populations that are most likely to self-harm. The contributors are drawn from a wide range of backgrounds, including clinical psychology, psychotherapy, group analysis and psychiatric nursing.

Areas of discussion include:

  • self-harm and young people in foster care and residential settings
  • self-harm in women's secure services
  • self-harm in people diagnosed with personality disorder

This book does not offer a prescription for self-harm cessation but rather describes therapeutic approaches to working with self-harm, and outlines the complex, subtle and meaningful interactions between those who engage in self-harm and those who seek to understand it. With a specialist interest in women's self-harm, Managing Self-Harmwill be essential reading for all mental health professionals, including clinical psychologists, psychotherapists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses and social workers.

Excerpt

This book is designed to help clinicians, people who self-harm and their families to understand its causes, meaning and treatment. The notion of managing self-harm is central to this text. The idea of managing self-harm is inextricably tied into understanding it. The book does not offer a prescription for stopping self-harm, or specific behavioural guidelines but rather describes therapeutic approaches to working with self-harm, and outlines the complex, subtle and meaningful interaction between those who engage in self-harm and those who seek to understand it. What needs to be managed is not only the behaviour and distress of those who self-harm, but also what can be the overwhelming and potentially unhelpful responses of therapists and other workers, who may find the intensity of their own feelings in relation to self-harm too much to bear. When these countertransference feelings can be thought about and contained, they become a tool to understanding what it is that self-harm communicates. At this point, meaningful engagement and therapeutic work can begin. There are many voices in this book, and each chapter integrates theory with clinical illustration, enabling the direct experiences of those who self-harm to be heard. Throughout the book, the contributors provide clinical material to bring theory alive. The book is designed to describe, illustrate and make intelligible the function, meaning and complexity of self-harm, in the populations most at risk. The selection of contributors reflects the populations in which self-harm occurs most frequently – adolescents, young people in care and women in secure mental health and custodial settings. Many of these people will not feature in the official statistics unless they make actual suicide attempts or are treated in emergency rooms, and disclose that the cause of their injury is self-inflicted.
Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.