The Psychology of Entertainment Media: Blurring the Lines between Entertainment and Persuasion

The Psychology of Entertainment Media: Blurring the Lines between Entertainment and Persuasion

The Psychology of Entertainment Media: Blurring the Lines between Entertainment and Persuasion

The Psychology of Entertainment Media: Blurring the Lines between Entertainment and Persuasion

Synopsis

In this volume, psychologists and communication experts present theory on understanding and predicting how learning occurs through media consumption. As the impact of traditional advertising has declined over the last couple of decades, marketers have scrambled to find other ways to effectively communicate with consumers. Among other approaches, marketers have utilized various forms of product integration. Product integration is mixing a commercial message in with the non-commercial message via TV, movie, video, and other entertainment venues. This book will be of interest to students and researchers in psychology, marketing, communication, advertising, and consumer behavior.

Excerpt

I started with the same question in the first edition: Is there anything unique about entertainment media that warrants such close scrutiny and scientific interest? Why is persuasion through entertainment media different from any other forms of persuasion, both in terms of effects and processes? If current theories of persuasion can just as easily (and accurately) account for effects that occur within entertainment media (e.g., TV programs, films) as they can for effects that occur between entertainment media (e.g., advertisements), Occam’s razor would lop off the unneeded new theory devoted to entertainment media. Although there are a number of theoretical constructs that can account for certain effects of entertainment media (e.g., situation models, sourcemonitoring, story schemas; Johnson, 2002), current dual-processing models have a difficult time accounting for some types of media effects, particularly those occurring during the processing of narratives. In fact, there is ample evidence that people process entertainment (narrative) and promotional (rhetorical) information differently. Thus, it is likely that the ways in which entertainment and promotion exert effects on audiences are correspondingly different. The purpose of this book is to highlight these differences by documenting the effects that entertainment media have on audiences and to illuminate how these effects occur. Both components are critical in making for a better-informed consumer and public, and this . . .
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