The Education-Drug Use Connection: How Successes and Failures in School Relate to Adolescent Smoking, Drinking, Drug Use, and Delinquency

The Education-Drug Use Connection: How Successes and Failures in School Relate to Adolescent Smoking, Drinking, Drug Use, and Delinquency

The Education-Drug Use Connection: How Successes and Failures in School Relate to Adolescent Smoking, Drinking, Drug Use, and Delinquency

The Education-Drug Use Connection: How Successes and Failures in School Relate to Adolescent Smoking, Drinking, Drug Use, and Delinquency

Synopsis

Does success in school protect teenagers from drug use? Does drug use impair scholastic success? This book tackles a key issue in adolescent development and health - the education-drug use connection. The authors examine the links and likely causal connections between educational experiences, delinquent behavior, and adolescent use of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine. The book uses data from the University of Michigan's Monitoring the Future project. It focuses on a large and nationally representative sample of 8th grade students in the United States who were initially surveyed in 1991-1993 and then followed over the vitally important developmental period between ages 14 and 22. The volume uses a variety of statistical analysis techniques, and the findings can be understood by individuals with limited, as well as with extensive, backgrounds in research design. The findings convincingly demonstrate that if young people can be successful in school, it can improve a broad range of outcomes in their lives, not the least of which is their ability to resist pressures to use drugs. relevant literature; a detailed discussion of the survey and analysis methods; the academic attainment of those in the longitudinal panel; the delinquent behaviors of panel members as they relate to measures of educational success; and the patterns of initiation, continuation, and cessation for each substance: cigarettes, marijuana, cocaine, and alcohol. This book is intended for anyone who deals with education and/or substance use, including educational, developmental, and social psychologists; sociologists; epidemiologists; educators; and policy makers. The analysis of panel survey data, using a variety of techniques, will also appeal to survey methodologists and students.

Excerpt

Young people in adolescence face a variety of important developmental tasks. To the extent they can succeed in those tasks, and at the same time avoid behaviors that place them at risk of immediate or long-term health consequences, their futures will be brighter. This book focuses on a key issue in adolescent development and health—the links between educational success and failure, on one hand, and substance use and other problem behaviors, on the other. It is a well-established fact that educational success and substance use are negatively related, but questions remain about the extent to which substance use in adolescence causes reduced academic attainment, versus the extent to which substance use is a consequence of earlier educational failures. The purposes of this book are to (a) examine and document the various linkages among educational experiences, delinquent behavior in general, and substance use specifically (including tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and cocaine use); (b) estimate the relative importance of the several causal processes involved; and (c) address policy implications of the findings.

In pursuing these purposes, the book employs a unique and valuable data set from the University of Michigan’s Monitoring the Future (MTF) project. The project’s annual reports of drug use by youth and young adults in the United States are widely used and cited. These annual MTF reports are based on large, nationally representative annual in-school surveys of high school seniors (since 1975) and 8th- and 10th-grade students (since 1991), as well as mail surveys that follow the high school graduates into young and middle adulthood. The present book takes advantage of all of these data resources in order to place our findings in their larger context. However, our primary focus here is on a relatively new data set from the project—a longitudinal panel study that tracked eighth-grade adolescents into young adulthood, with survey content that includes family background, educational experiences, delinquent behaviors, substance use, and more. This large and nationally representative sample of eighth-grade students in the . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.