Child Protection, Public Health and Nursing

Child Protection, Public Health and Nursing

Child Protection, Public Health and Nursing

Child Protection, Public Health and Nursing

Synopsis

Highlighting and examining the vital role of nurses in protecting children from maltreatment, this book explores the input of nurses from different disciplines to the work of protecting children and young people. It draws on relevant theoretical, research and policy literature but focuses in particular on the evidence base for the value of their work.While orientated towards UK practice, the book includes some comparative material to add a wider European perspective. The text includes discussion of specialist public health nursing roles such as health visiting and school nursing, as well as the contribution of those who have more general nursing roles but whose work brings them into contact with children, young people and their families.This volume will inform all qualified nurses working in acute care and primary care settings who have contact with children, young people and their families. It will also be of use to those undertaking post-qualifying and post-graduate courses and is particularly relevant for Specialist Community Public Health Nurses (SCPHNs) many of whom, once qualified, have significant child protection roles in practice.

Excerpt

Following the 2015 general election, with a new government in post, the revision of the Working Together guidance and the recent revelations of historic abuse leading to major enquiries and consideration of current practice, Child Protection, Public Health and Nursing is a welcome and timely publication. The authors and their fellow contributors remind us that nursing staff have a critical role in safeguarding and protecting children and also in contributing to a public health agenda that should embrace tackling child abuse and neglect. This book, aimed at nurses, health visitors and those working in child protection, helpfully discusses what is meant by the public health framework and why our strategy for preventing child maltreatment has to be framed in this way. Child Protection, Public Health and Nursing also looks at the challenges and difficulties that nurses face in safeguarding children and suggests possible solutions. As public health nurses, there is no doubt that health visitors particularly have a critical role to play.

I have long been a supporter of the work of health visitors, school nurses, community nurses and a range of other nurses in meeting the needs of families, protecting children and preventing abuse. The universal nature of nursing provision – or variations of that universalism, as described in this book – mean that the service reaches all children and young people and their families and is delivered in non-stigmatising ways. The culture of some professional groups creates barriers between themselves and their service users in contrast to nurses who can be more accessible. Nurses spend greater amounts of time with families, children and young people, affording opportunities for health visitors and nurses to build relationships, and both observe their families and the conditions in which they are living and identify causes for concern.

A number of years ago, with my colleague Jane Naish, I co-edited a series of papers which were published in Key Issues in Child Protection . . .

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