Cyberbullying: Causes, Consequences, and Coping Strategies

Cyberbullying: Causes, Consequences, and Coping Strategies

Cyberbullying: Causes, Consequences, and Coping Strategies

Cyberbullying: Causes, Consequences, and Coping Strategies

Synopsis

Weber and Pelfrey examine qualitative and quantitative data collected from middle and high school students in a large urban area regarding the use of social technologies in cyberbullying perpetration and victimization. They further explore the interconnectedness between the online and face-to-face environments created by these advancements in technology which may produce risk taking behaviors and school safety issues. Students reported a carryover between environments (during school and after school via social technology) that create a constant access to peers and a reciprocal relationship between cyberbullying perpetrators and victims who become perpetrators in retaliation. The book also provides insight from school staff regarding policies, protocols, and approaches to combating cyberbullying in school.

Excerpt

John Halligan writes in Kowalski, Limber, and Agatston’s (2008) book, Cyber Bullying: Bullying in the Digital Age:

October 7, 2003, will always be the day that divides my life.
Before that day, my son Ryan was alive. A sweet, gentle, and
lanky 13-year-old fumbling his way through early adolescence
and trying to establish his place in the often confusing and
difficult social world of middle school. After that day, my son
would be gone forever. A death by suicide. Some would call it
bullycide or even cyber bullycide. I just call it a huge hole in
my heart that will never heal … My son was an early casualty
and his death an early warning to our society that we’d better
pay close attention to how our children use technology. We
need to study this new societal problem with a sense of
urgency and great diligence. (p. ix-xi)

Advancements in social technologies are currently changing our everyday experiences as they allow us to extend our network of relationships to a world that is accessible with a mere click of the mouse or swipe of a screen 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. These advancements are profoundly transforming how we work, learn, and communicate with one another. In the workplace we rely on the Internet to connect us to the latest information, as well as communicate and collaborate with fellow workers via email, instant messengers, and video conferencing. Scholars use electronic databases to conduct research and utilize learning management systems to teach and take courses online. Socially, we use communicative platforms (e.g., Google Chat, Skype, email) and social networking sites (i.e., Facebook, Twitter, Instagram) to connect with colleagues, friends, and family members. We snap pictures and record videos with our cell phones for upload to YouTube or Facebook to share with not only our world, but . . .

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