Campus Rape Victims: How They See the Police

Campus Rape Victims: How They See the Police

Campus Rape Victims: How They See the Police

Campus Rape Victims: How They See the Police

Synopsis

James attempts to accurately measure crimes that occur on a college campus and whether students' perceptions of police influenced their decisions to report their victimization, specifically sexual assault victimization. Her study utilized a survey methodology to gather data which were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results of the analyses indicated that victimization reporting and satisfaction with the police was impacted by gender. Results also showed that fear of victimization and perceptions of crime influence satisfaction with the police. There was also limited support found for the proposition that perceptions of the police influence likelihood to report victimization.

Excerpt

Though there have been several studies examining the crime of sexual assault, the exact prevalence of this crime is still unknown. According to Russell (1982), the prevalence of sexual assault of women in the general population ranges widely from 15 percent to 78 percent, depending on the type of data collection or methodology used to gather this information. According to Belknap (2000), the prevalence of sexual assault is estimated to be from 1-in-4 to 1-in-8 women. Additionally, the Breiding et al. (2014) study found that during their lifetime approximately 19.3% of women say they have been raped, and almost 43.9% had experienced some type of sexual violence within their lives other than rape. Koss and Burkhart (1989) estimated that 15 percent to 22 percent of women have been raped at some point in their lifetime, though very few of the women seek assistance for this victimization. Researchers also have determined that sexual assault is one of the least reported of all crimes (Fisher, Daigle, Cullen, & Turner, 2003; Fisher, Daigle, & Cullen, 2010; Lizotte, 1985; Ménard, 2005; Reddington & Kreisel, 2009; Rennison, Dragiewicz, & DeKeseredy, 2013; Sampson, 2002), and this fact could cause the apparent discrepancy in determining actual prevalence rates. This lack of reporting may be due to fear of being blamed (Felson & Pare, 2005; Fisher et al., 2003, 2010; Rennison et al., 2013), fear of reprisal (Fisher et al., 2010; Planty, Langton, Krebs, Berzofsky, & Smiley-McDonald, 2013; Sampson, 2002), or a belief that the criminal justice system will not offer an effective official response (Sampson, 2002; Taylor & Norma, 2012).

Though researchers have not yet determined the true prevalence of sexual assault, most researchers would agree that the largest proportion of victims are women between the ages of 16 and 24 years old who are enrolled in colleges or universities at the time of their victimization (Fisher et al., 2000, 2003, 2010, Karjane, Fisher, & Cullen, 2005; Kilpatrick, Resnick, Ruggiero, Conoscenti, & McCauley, 2007; Krebs, Lindquist, Warner, Fisher, & Martin, 2009; Miller, Canales, Amacker, Backstrom, & Gidycz, 2011; Sampson, 2002; Tjaden & Thonnes, 2000 . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.