American Victimology

American Victimology

American Victimology

American Victimology

Synopsis

McShane and Emeka examine the varied forces that shape the criminal justice system's responses to victims in America today. They explore the historical, legal, political, economic, social, and cultural dynamics of perceptions of victims and their experiences. The text focuses on why certain victims have more access to and impact on the justice system and how policy seems to form around their needs. Readers are encouraged to theorize as to how these higher profile cases differ from the more routine victimizations that occur each day. Throughout this book, students are offered broader and more controversial definitions of victims. The authors provide critical insights into both traditional and less traditional approaches to the treatment of victim issues in our society. Upon considering the issues in this text, students will appreciate the new ideas they now hold about the role of victims in our society.

Excerpt

Every day, news of victims dominates the media. While the public uses each unique story and scenario to attempt to understand crime and victimization, those in the field must generalize events in ways that allow us to scientifically analyze patterns and trends. It is only through the rational interpretation of evidence that we can build models that will allow us to more effectively predict and prevent future victimization. This text endeavors to provide a framework for discussing the way victim issues impact the criminal justice system. The history, politics and economics of victim-related laws and policies do not exist in a vacuum, rather they are intricately related to the other elements of the criminal justice system and are shaped by the way the public interprets them.

The text is meant to be issue-based and tries as much as possible to avoid weighing the student down with data, the rapidly changing rates, and frequencies of the various types of crimes one might be victimized by. Each chapter attempts to challenge students on the boundaries of roles, definitions and consequences that guide policy-making in criminal justice as well as treatments and interventions. At the conclusion of the chapter, there are recommended books and movies that students might be interested in. These popular culture links to victimology help to personalize and humanize the experiences of those we encounter in the justice system. Not only are their stories important for us to study, but it is also meaningful to understand why some victims and incidents seem more media-worthy than others.

Ours is a diverse and multicultural society so views on victims will reflect that heterogeneity. It is hoped that the moral and ethical dilemmas of dealing with victims will be an important part of the dialogue stimulated by this book.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.