Diversity in American Higher Education: Toward a More Comprehensive Approach

Diversity in American Higher Education: Toward a More Comprehensive Approach

Diversity in American Higher Education: Toward a More Comprehensive Approach

Diversity in American Higher Education: Toward a More Comprehensive Approach

Synopsis

Unlike other volumes on diversity, 'Diversity in American Higher Education' conceptualizes diversity broadly to include not only race/ethnicity and gender, but also socioeconomic status and sexual and political orientation.

Excerpt

At least since the Supreme Court’s landmark 1978 affirmative action case, Regents of the University of California v. Bakke, there has been no shortage of scholarly attention to the topic of diversity in higher education. In 2003, when the Supreme Court revisited its affirmative action ruling with a pair of decisions involving the University of Michigan, diversity in higher education gained new and additional attention. In both cases, a quarter-century apart, the Court considered and affirmed the importance of diversity, broadly defined, to living and learning on college and university campuses. As the affirmative action debate continues and higher education becomes a goal, and even a necessity, for more and more Americans, there is still a very active conversation about the way in which diversity is defined and achieved in lecture halls, dorm rooms, and dining halls on campus and the extent to which it is or should be a core educational value. So, too, the question of what it means for a diverse group of university faculty and staff to provide equal and excellent education to a diverse group of students is increasingly urgent.

Our volume attempts to capture under one cover a wide range of critical issues that comprise the current discourse on diversity in higher education by including issues not only related to race/ethnicity and gender, but also to socioeconomic status, and sexual and political orientation. It recognizes that higher education access and equity challenges do not begin when students apply for college, but are rooted in the politics and practice of K–12 education. Accordingly, Section I, the first of the four major sections of this volume, begins with a focus on educational equity in K–12 schooling. Section II moves to the postsecondary level and addresses the shifting meaning of diversity over time and the ramifications of the current diversity rationale on admissions, educational practice, and organizational structure. Section III begins with an assessment of progress made toward . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.