The Philosophy of Primary Education: An Introduction

The Philosophy of Primary Education: An Introduction

The Philosophy of Primary Education: An Introduction

The Philosophy of Primary Education: An Introduction

Synopsis

Publishing December 2011, Routledge Library Editions are pleased to release information on an exciting multi-volume set reissue. RLE Education a 244 Volume set which is available to purchase as a multi-volume set, individually, as part of a mini-set or as an eBook.

Excerpt

Free and indiscriminate use of words such as discovery has led some
critics to the view that English primary education needs to be more
firmly based on closely argued educational theory … What is
immediately needed is that teachers should bring to bear on their day
to day problems astringent intellectual scrutiny.’ (Plowden Report,
1967, para. 550.)

It must be confessed that there is little in the theoretical literature on English primary education that could fairly be called ‘astringent intellectual scrutiny’. All too often what one finds are doctrinal enthusiasms liberally laced with little stories about what Sandra, or Jonathan, or Josephine did, and how deeply satisfying it was. In so far as any awareness of a possible objector is shown at all, he is often something of a caricature created by a polarized emotional reaction against ‘formal teachers’. The ratio of assertion to argument is, therefore, as one would expect, extremely high, with little interest shown in gaining a critical or discriminating acceptance of what is asserted. That is why ‘doctrinal enthusiasm’ seems so apt a description for it.

Certainly the situation is one that badly calls for improvement, and for some greater token of respect for even quite ordinary standards of argument. This book does at least attempt to provide some ‘astringent intellectual scrutiny’, more especially of such central theoretical concepts as those of need, interest, growth, play, experience, activity and self-expression. The book also seeks to make a contribution towards getting a ‘closely argued educational theory’, in so far as something essentially interdisciplinary like educational theory can be closely argued from one point of view only, namely that of the philosophy of education. Psychological and sociological commentaries, and historical and comparative perspectives, are also relevant to educational theory . . .

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