Classical Music, Why Bother? Hearing the World of Contemporary Culture through a Composer's Ears

Classical Music, Why Bother? Hearing the World of Contemporary Culture through a Composer's Ears

Classical Music, Why Bother? Hearing the World of Contemporary Culture through a Composer's Ears

Classical Music, Why Bother? Hearing the World of Contemporary Culture through a Composer's Ears

Synopsis

Drawing on contemporary thought about 'design space' and 'universal Grammar' to show how intrinsic values can be rediscovered, this book looks at the importance of multimedia in allowing multiple points of entry for the discovering of new works. Classical Music: Why Bother? will intrigue all listeners of contemporary music, students of musical thought, and composers-but it will also interest students of contemporary aesthetics. It answers the age-old question How can we bring a new audience to contemporary art? - and challenges both the creators and their audience to broaden their ideas about what is valuable and lasting in today's culture.

Excerpt

It is now taken for granted that nothing which concerns art can be taken
for granted any more: neither art itself, nor art in its relationship to the
whole, nor even the right of art to exist
.

— Theodor W. Adorno

“Wait one second,” you say. “Art is not so imperiled as all that.” You might be thinking something along the same lines as Alice Goldfarb Marquis, an independent scholar who works in various fields as a sort of arts journalist and cultural critic. She likes to take the contrarian’s perspective that what the arts need is less government support (not more), therefore she regularly shows up on panel discussions about arts subsidies; in a “crossfire” world people who take an opposing view are always precious, even if the debates are sponsored by subsidized organizations. At the conclusion of Art Lessons: Learning from the Rise and Fall of Public Funding, her rather damning critique of well-meant but, she believes, ultimately misguided arts funding in the late-twentieth century, Dr. Marquis asserts that the National Endowment for the Arts is a group that “purveys a multitude of fictions: […] that non-profit arts . . .

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