Personality Disorders: Current Research and Treatments

Personality Disorders: Current Research and Treatments

Personality Disorders: Current Research and Treatments

Personality Disorders: Current Research and Treatments

Synopsis

As with a number of specific areas in the medical professions, the field of personality disorders has experienced a period of rapid growth and development over the past decade. This volume is designed to offer the student, practitioner and researcher with a single source for the most up-to-date research and treatment writing on a variety of specific areas within the field.

Excerpt

The chapters in this book largely come from the conference entitled “Personality Disorders: Update on Research and Treatment,” held at Stanford University in June of 2004. This was the third Update conference at Stanford which occurs every two years. This conference was started when members of the Association for Research in the Personality Disorders (ARPD) and members of the Stanford faculty realized that there was an increasing amount of empirical evidence on the personality disorders being produced, and that much of this was changing our conceptions of the personality disorders in a fairly rapid fashion. The conference was conceived as a way to bring together experts to communicate changes in the field to practicing clinicians. This book is intended to bring together some of this same information about research and clinical implications for the professional reading public.

The book is divided into three sections. The first focuses on interesting new research in the area of the personality disorders, the second on clinical aspects of new findings, while the last chapter is a bit of speculation about where we are going from here. To aid the busy reader in finding the sections of most relevance to them, each chapter has a listing of key teaching points (the latter items being a unique feature of the book). While not comprehensive, the book should give the reader a good feel about where some general trends in thinking about personality pathology are headed.

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