Black Education: A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for the New Century

Black Education: A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for the New Century

Black Education: A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for the New Century

Black Education: A Transformative Research and Action Agenda for the New Century

Synopsis

This volume presents the findings and recommendations of the American Educational Research Association's (AERA) Commission on Research in Black Education (CORIBE) and offers new directions for research and practice. By commissioning an independent group of scholars of diverse perspectives and voices to investigate major issues hindering the education of Black people in the U.S., other Diaspora contexts, and Africa, the AERA sought to place issues of Black education and research practice in the forefront of the agenda of the scholarly community. An unprecedented critical challenge to orthodox thinking, this book makes an epistemological break with mainstream scholarship. Contributors present research on proven solutions--best practices--that prepare Black students and others to achieve at high levels of academic excellence and to be agents of their own socioeconomic and cultural transformation. These analyses and empirical findings also link the crisis in Black education to embedded ideological biases in research and the system of thought that often justifies the abject state of Black education.

Written for both a scholarly and a general audience, this book demonstrates a transformative role for research and a positive role for culture in learning, in the academy, and in community and cross-national contexts. Volume editor Joyce E. King is the Benjamin E. Mays Endowed Chair of Urban Teaching, Learning and Leadership at Georgia State University and was chair of CORIBE.

Additional Resources

Black Education [CD-ROM]
Research and Best Practices 1999-2001
Edited by
Joyce E. King
Georgia State University
Informed by diverse perspectives and voices of leading researchers, teacher educators and classroom teachers, this rich, interactive CD-ROM contains an archive of the empirical findings, recommendations, and best practices assembled by the Commission on Research in Black Education. Dynamic multi-media presentations document concrete examples of transformative practice that prepare Black students and others to achieve academic and cultural excellence. This CD-ROM was produced with a grant from the SOROS Foundation, Open Society Institute.
0-8058-5564-5 [CD-ROM] / 2005 / Free Upon Request

A Detroit Conversation [Video]
Edited by
Joyce E. King
Georgia State University

In this 20-minute video-documentary a diverse panel of educators--teachers, administrators, professors, a "reform" Board member, and parent and community activists--engage in a "no holds barred" conversation about testing, teacher preparation, and what is and is not working in Detroit schools, including a school for pregnant and parenting teens and Timbuktu Academy. Concrete suggestions for research and practice are offered.
0-8058-5625-0 [Video] / 2005 / $10.00

A Charge to Keep [Video]
The Findings and Recommendations of te AERA Commission on Research in Black Education
Edited by
Joyce E. King
Georgia State University

This 50-minute video documents the findings and recommendations of the Commission on Research in Black Education (CORIBE), including exemplary educational approaches that CORIBE identified, cameo commentaries by Lisa Delpit, Gloria Ladson-Billings, Kathy Au, Donna Gollnick, Adelaide L. Sanford, Asa Hilliard, Edmund Gordon and others, and an extended interview with Sylvia Wynter.
0-8058-5626-9 [Video] / 2005 / $10.00

Excerpt

Living long enough gives one perspective to see life not as a series of random events but, rather, as a continuum of sorts that we move along— sometimes smoothly, sometimes slowly, sometimes back and forth and sometimes running in place. We are not functioning in isolated, disjointed episodes. Our learning, our relationships, our careers each represent multiple, multitextured events, times, encounters, and thoughts. Yet, in an attempt to document our stories, be they histories, studies, experiments, or fictions, we look for the “moment,” that something or event that places in high relief what we try desperately to express about what matters.

As we try to understand something like the fight for equity and justice in schools, we may point to May 17, 1954, the Brown v. Board of Education decision as an event or moment in time, but we know in truth, Brown is emblematic of a lifetime of struggle for civil rights and social justice. Indeed, one of the first challenges to separate and unequal schooling took place in Boston in 1849 when Benjamin Cushing sued the Boston School Committee for not allowing him to enroll his daughter in one of the white schools near their home. But, we are focused on the 1954 moment. Viewing life through moments is how we economize both thought and language to create coherence.

And so it is with this volume. It is an artifact, a symbol, a material product of the moment, but in actuality it represents a very long and difficult path of scholarly and social justice work. The fact of this volume may, in some way, occlude the struggle it represents. It appears in a moment, but it was conceived, constructed, and carried out over a long period of struggle within educational research in general and the American Educational Research Association (AERA) in particular. As a result of a publication conflict, the Research Focus on Black Education Special Interest Group mobilized to address ongoing issues of equity and justice in the association.

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