Living with Dyslexia: The Social and Emotional Consequences of Specific Learning Difficulties/Disabilities

Living with Dyslexia: The Social and Emotional Consequences of Specific Learning Difficulties/Disabilities

Living with Dyslexia: The Social and Emotional Consequences of Specific Learning Difficulties/Disabilities

Living with Dyslexia: The Social and Emotional Consequences of Specific Learning Difficulties/Disabilities

Synopsis

This book reinforces the need for understanding and support for children
with dyslexia from parents and teachers, but also the importance of the
children's own understanding of their strengths and weaknesses in order
to fulfil their potential. It should be recommended reading for all
those involved in dyslexia. - Professor Angela Fawcett, Director of the Centre for Child Research, Swansea University

What is it like living with dyslexia on a day-to-day basis?

Based on interviews with dyslexic children and their families, this insightful book presents first-hand accounts of how dyslexia affects the children themselves and the people around them.

Living with Dyslexia, Second Edition places the original fascinating findings within the context of current research and practice in the UK, Europe, Australia and the USA. The author:

  • examines issues of confidence and self-esteem;
  • explores the coping strategies adopted by children and adults with dyslexia;
  • investigates the concept of dyslexia-friendly schools;
  • studies how children were first identified as having dyslexia, and the social and emotional difficulties they encountered;
  • offers guidance on how teachers and parents can best support children with specific learning difficulties;
  • considers the cognitive, educational, social and emotional perspectives in order for teachers and parents to gain a better understanding of dyslexia.

This new edition provides an updated account of cognitive research and examines important changes in relation to Special Educational Needs policy and practice in the last ten years, including the Revised SEN Code of Practice (2001), Removing Barriers to Achievement (2004) and the National Literacy Strategy (2006).

Living with Dyslexia recognises that the voices of children with dyslexia are increasingly important in developing good educational practice and makes an important contribution to the literature on dyslexia.

Excerpt

It is a very great pleasure to be asked to provide a foreword to the second edition of Living with Dyslexia, following in the footsteps of Baroness Warnock, who contributed the preface to the first edition. I have followed Barbara Riddick’s work for some years and delighted in her concern for the well being of the dyslexic child, which is so often overlooked in research which concentrates solely on literacy outcomes for these children. The 12 years since the previous edition was published have seen substantial changes in the approach to dyslexia, with the UK in my view, leading the field in provision, with the 1994 Code of Practice leading to an emphasis on earlier identification, inclusion and moves towards the dyslexia-friendly school. This period has seen the publication of a range of screening tests to identify children at risk for dyslexia, and new developments in methods of support, including the US concept of response to intervention. It has also seen the development of new theories of dyslexia, which recognise the wider context within which dyslexic children may struggle. It is clear that all of these changes must impact on the outcome for children with dyslexia, and they are outlined clearly here. However, one of the most important changes which the previous edition of this book was instrumental in achieving has been the acknowledgement that the social and emotional consequences of dyslexia can be the most difficult to overcome. This has led to further research in the areas of self-efficacy and self-esteem in dyslexia. This book reinforces the need for understanding and support for children with dyslexia from parents and teachers, but also the importance of the children’s own understanding of their strengths and weaknesses in order to fulfil their potential. It should be recommended reading for all those involved in dyslexia.

Angela Fawcett Director of the Centre for Child Research, Swansea University . . .

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