Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts

Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts

Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts

Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts

Synopsis

Heidegger's writings are among the most formidable in recent philosophy. The pivotal concepts of his thought are for many the source of both fascination and frustration. Yet any student of philosophy needs to become acquainted with Heidegger's thought. "Martin Heidegger: Key Concepts" is designed to facilitate this. Each chapter introduces and explains a key Heideggerian concept, or a cluster of closely related concepts. Together, the chapters cover the full range of Heidegger's thought in its early, middle, and later phases.

Excerpt

Bret W. Davis

“ Basic concepts” or Ground-Concepts” [Grundbegriffe] means
for us here: grasping [begreifen] the ground [Grund] of beings
as a whole. … When we have grasped something we also say
something has opened up to us. … Thus “to grasp” [Be-greifen]
the ground means above all that the “ essence” of the ground
embraces us into itself [ein-begriffen], and that it speaks to us in
our knowing about it.          (BC 18–19 = GA 51: 21, trans. mod.)

Martin Heidegger (1889–1976) is widely considered to be the most famous, influential and controversial philosopher of the twentieth century. His writings are also among the most formidable. The fundamental concepts of his thought are for many the source of both fascination and frustration. Yet any student of philosophy – or of contemporary thought in general – needs to become acquainted with Heidegger’s main ideas. This book is designed to facilitate this process. Each chapter introduces and explains a key concept – or a cluster of closely related concepts – in Heidegger’s thought. Together, the chapters cover the full range of his path of thought in its early, middle and later periods.

What are the key concepts of Heidegger’s thought? A selection of the most important of these appear in the chapter titles of this book: the thinking of being; the hermeneutics of facticity; phenomenology; Dasein as being-in-the-world; care and authenticity; being and time; the turn; the German People; truth as alētheia and the clearing of beyng; the work of art; Ereignis (the event of appropriation); the history of being; will and Gelassenheit (releasement); Ge-stell (enframing as the essence of technology); language and poetry; the fourfold; and ontotheology . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.