Prisoner Resettlement: Policy and Practice

Prisoner Resettlement: Policy and Practice

Prisoner Resettlement: Policy and Practice

Prisoner Resettlement: Policy and Practice

Synopsis

Prisoner resettlement is high on current political and policy agendas. The high reconviction rates of ex-prisoners have been acknowledged for many years but the rapidly rising prison population has meant that more prisoners than ever before are released. This together with the pressure this puts on to the infrastructure of the prison estate and the publication of two influential reports which highlighted the problems faced by prisoners leaving prison has concentrated attention on attempts to ensure that prisoners do not return to prison once released. The resettlement of prisoners is now a priority policy area linked directly to Government initiatives to reduce reoffending. The renewed policy interest in prisoners resettlement forms the context of this volume, which brings together current knowledge and understanding about prisoners resettlement. The book draws on the contributors extensive experience as researchers and practitioners in the field and includes contributions from acknowledged experts. Prisoner Resettlement provides a comprehensive review and analysis of resettlement policy and practice in England and Wales in the early part of the 21st century. In particular it: critically reviews current policy, theory, practice and research on prisoners resettlement explores practice issues through case studies of two resettlement initiatives and an examination of accommodation provision and voluntary sector involvement in prisoners resettlement; and examines the particular issues raised by the resettlement of different groups of prisoners including women, minority ethnic groups, prolific and priority offenders and high-risk offenders.

Excerpt

This book primarily arose out of a one-day conference organised by the authors, Maureen Cain and Paul Kiff under the auspices of the British Society of Criminology in December 2005. While organising the conference we recognised that there was a substantial amount of knowledge, experience and evidence about prisoner resettlement which was not written down and could easily be lost if there was a shift in government priorities. Furthermore, one of us was acutely aware that some important evidence was not in the public domain. This book is an attempt to record the evidence base about prisoner resettlement which has been amassed at the start of the twenty-first century.

A number of people have been crucial in producing this book. First and foremost, we would like to thank the contributors who readily agreed to participate, produced the chapters we asked for and dealt with our queries swiftly. They also agreed with our suggestion that the fees should go to charity. Our thanks also go to Maureen Cain and Paul Kiff for their assistance with organising the original conference and Brian Willan and his team for sticking with us despite the delays. Anthea would especially like to thank Emma Wincup who has often been the voice of calm and reason during the four years we have been doing resettlement research together.

Finally, we thank our respective partners, John and Peter, ‘who end up doing all the things we don’t have time to do because we’re working’.

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