Genocide in Iraq

Genocide in Iraq

Genocide in Iraq

Genocide in Iraq

Synopsis

The current horrific malaise in the state of Iraq has its roots in the US-led destruction of Iraq in 1991, followed by a decade of harsh US-led international sanctions against the entire Iraqi population that killed millions -- one of the most heinous crimes of the 20th century. A second "shock and awe" war of aggression on Iraq in 2003 enabled the US/UK military occupation that ensued. Though based on fraudulent pretexts and later admitted as an illegal war by then Secretary-General Kofi Annan, the UN provided a veneer of legitimacy to what in effect would be the obliteration of an effective and functional modern state, redefining its national character via the redrafting of state policies and law, even deliberately sowing seeds that could lead to its future implosion. Volume II of Genocide in Iraq addresses Bremer's introduction of the imperialist design for Iraq as part of a wider strategy for the Middle East. It details the scale of post-2003 destruction and redesign, showing clearly how every step was intended to change Iraq irreversibly to a slave state of extreme neoliberal capitalism. It documents the extent of intentional and ongoing damage as it relates to killing, torture and displacement, cultural cleansing and genocide, and ensuing problems in health, child education, psychological well being, malnutrition, child disabilities, child labor and mortality, as well as drug abuse and the impact on women. It tracks the divestment and disposal of Iraqi oil. These Nuremberg-level crimes are then reviewed in international legal context as the crime of aggression, crimes against humanity, and violations of the most basic of human rights, as it relates to the right of remedy, in the hope of providing guidance to Iraqi individuals or governments seeking recourse in future.

Excerpt

No serious work, in our view, has been undertaken to explain the Western European constant determination to conquer and subjugate the Arab World. While we do not claim to address this lacuna, it remains a fact that the West has, over the last millennia, demonstrated that desire in the form of waves of conquests, invasions and occupations. The justifications for such violence were only fabricated later to avoid divulging the ulterior motive.

Long before the concept of the nation-state took hold of European thinking, the crusaders settled the west coast of Greater Syria using the propaganda of religious expeditionary wars and Christian entitlement, due to it being the birthplace of Jesus. The campaign had little if anything to do with Christianity and everything to do with power and conquest. It was no more religious than the attempt by the Ottomans to extend their empire into the Balkans. The crusades were a unique experiment in conquest, the like of which had not been seen before. This assemblage between 1095 and 1291 of armies from so many different countries to invade that part of the Arab world set a precedent. It was repeated in 1991 when almost all the countries of the West took part in the war on Iraq. Between the crusades and the invasion of Iraq in 1991, no other similar Western expedition was carried out with such zealous, destructive and deadly barbarity. This in itself should raise questions!

The creation of the crusaders enclave on the Eastern Mediterranean demonstrated the existence of another phenomenon, namely that of the intention, asserted as a right, of Europeans to settle any part of world and, if necessary, cleanse it of its original inhabitants. After the crusades, Europeans—mainly Anglo-Saxon, French, Spanish and . . .

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