Business Continuity Management: A Crisis Management Approach

Business Continuity Management: A Crisis Management Approach

Business Continuity Management: A Crisis Management Approach

Business Continuity Management: A Crisis Management Approach

Synopsis

Since the publication of the first edition in 2002, interest in crisis management has been fuelled by a number of events, including 9/11.

The first edition of this text was praised for its rigorous yet logical approach, and this is continued in the second edition, which provides a well-researched, theoretically robust approach to the topic combined with empirical research in continuity management. New chapters are included on digital resilience and principles of risk management for business continuity. All chapters are revised and updated with particular attention being paid to the impact on smaller companies. New cases include: South Africa Bank, Lego, Morgan Stanley Dean Witter; small companies impacted by 9/11; and the New York City power outage of August 2003.

Excerpt

Since the first edition of this book was prepared and subsequently published, the world seems to have changed. The first decade of the twentyfirst century has witnessed constant reminders of the power of natural forces of the planet we inhabit. The South East Asian Tsunami of 2004, earthquakes in China, Italy and Pakistan, hurricanes striking the islands of the Caribbean and the US coastline, famine in Africa, flooding in the UK and along the Danube, forest and bush fires in Australia, Greece and Indonesia may all have been triggered by human activity but caused tremendous problems for people, communities, businesses of all kinds, governments and even politicians. Human activity in the forms of terrorism struck Britain, India, Pakistan, Russia, Spain and of course the attacks of 9/11 in New York and Washington. Our global society has become ever more connected, be it through trade, communication, the Web, ease of travel of people, viruses and pollution, global warming and our dependence upon one another and certain key but finite resources. This mutual dependence has been reinforced by the so-called credit crunch, which, at the time of writing in April 2009, appears to be triggering an economic downturn in many parts of the world. These are the macro, media grabbing events, but business continuity is concerned, often, with the minutiae of organisations, with micro as well as macro triggers and as dependencies have increased so has the vulnerability of all organisations.

Against this backdrop, the need for business continuity in its broadest sense has never been greater. The need for inter-organisational business continuity, from a strategic to an operational level, has never been more urgent. The need for creative approaches to continuity, grounded in rich insight but manifest in adaptive and flexible capability, in place of rigid, “safe” but ineffective solutions is also clear. This edition has been prepared in the spirit of desiring to make a contribution to the practice of business continuity. We wish to thank friends, associates and sponsors from the business continuity community, particularly the anonymous contributors to our research, and colleagues from Taylor & Francis for ongoing support and patience. We would like to thank our colleagues from De Montfort University, Silberman College of Business and University of Liverpool.

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