Depression: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with Children and Young People

Depression: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with Children and Young People

Depression: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with Children and Young People

Depression: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with Children and Young People

Synopsis

In recent years there has been an increase in research into childhood depression, and it is now recognised that depression can severely impair young people in many aspects of their life, school, peer and social relationships, and frequently persists into adulthood.

Depression: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy with Children and Young People provides an accessible guide to recognising and treating depression in young people. Based on a successful manual developed for research trials, this book presents an overview of a cognitive behavioural model for working with this age group, as well as practical ideas about how to start therapy. Topics covered include:

  • engaging young people
  • setting goals for therapy
  • cognitive behaviour assessment and formulation
  • solutions for problems practitioners may face
  • encouraging parents and agencies to support therapy.

Depression includes case examples and practical tips to prepare the practitioner for working with young people. Information is presented in a readable and practical style making this book ideal for professionals working in child and adolescent mental health services, as well as those in training. It will also be a useful guide for people working in community services for young people.

Online resources:

The appendices of this book contain worksheets that can be downloaded free of charge to purchasers of the print version. Please visit the website to find out more about this facility

Excerpt

Until the 1970s it was generally believed that depressive disorders as seen in adults were rare in childhood. Depressive symptoms were considered a normal part of adolescence. Mood swings, low mood and irritability were seen as the consequences of developmental changes involved in the onset of puberty and adjusting to increasing independence and role changes. Studies in the 1970s and 1980s (Puig-Antich, 1982; Pearce, 1978; Weinberg et al., 1973) showed that depressive disorders occurred before adulthood. It is now recognised that depression can severely impair a young person in many important aspects of their life, school, peer and social relationships, and also will frequently persist into adulthood. In recent years there has been a significant increase in research activity in the area of depression in children and young people but still there are gaps in knowledge compared with the work on adults. The focus of research has moved away from the nature of depression in young people to recognition of the need for better identification of symptoms, referral on to appropriate services and delivering effective treatments.

In clinical use, the term depression is used to describe a cluster of symptoms involving significant changes in mood, in thinking and in activity. These symptoms persist and result in changes in personal and social functioning over a period of at least 2 weeks. Depressed mood may be accompanied by tearfulness and includes sadness and/or irritability with a loss of enjoyment of everyday activities. Children appear unhappy and may report feeling hopeless, helpless and miserable. Cognitive changes can include changes in ability to concentrate and attend to school work. Feelings of worthlessness, self-blame and a general lack of confidence are often present. In severe depression the young person may feel guilty and personally responsible for any past problems. This can be associated with suicidal ideas.

There may be changes in sleeping, eating, energy levels and motivation. Sleep problems may occur in a number of different ways but will involve a change from the young person’s normal pattern. There may be increased . . .

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