Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: Distinctive Features

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: Distinctive Features

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: Distinctive Features

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: Distinctive Features

Synopsis

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach designed particularly to treat the problems of chronically suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). The therapy articulates a series of principles that effectively guide clinicians in responding to suicidal and other behaviours that challenge them when treating this population.

Dialectical Behaviour Therapyhighlights 30 distinctive features of the treatment and uses extensive clinical examples to demonstrate how the theory translates into practice. In part I: The Distinctive Theoretical Features of DBT, the authors introduce us to the three foundations on which the treatment rests - behaviourism, Zen and dialectics - and how these integrate. In part II: The Distinctive Practical Features of DBT, Swales and Heard describe both how the therapy applies these principles to the treatment of clients with borderline personality disorder and elucidate the distinctive conceptual twists in the application of cognitive and behavioural procedures within the treatment.

This book provides a clear and structured overview of a complex treatment. It is written for both practicing clinicians and students wishing to learn more about DBT and how it differs from the other cognitive behaviour therapies.

Excerpt

Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) is a psychotherapeutic approach designed to treat the problems of chronically suicidal individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). This book articulates the principles of the treatment, focusing particularly on principles that distinguish DBT from other cognitivebehavioural treatments. In common with all the books in this series, this volume has two parts, the first devoted to theory and the second to practice. The theoretical component of the book illustrates distinctive features of DBT relating to its three foundations: behaviourism (Points 6–8), dialectical philosophy (Point 3) and Zen (Point 9). The second part of the book focuses on practice and how the philosophical and theoretical underpinnings of the treatment flow into the treatment structure and strategies.

DBT is based on a transactional bio-social theory of the aetiology of the affect regulation problems of BPD (Point 4). Individuals with a biological emotional vulnerability and raised in environments that systematically invalidate their inner experiences and overt behaviours develop deficits in both the capacity and the motivation to manage their emotions and other . . .

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