Psychology for Social Workers: Black Perspectives on Human Development and Behaviour

Psychology for Social Workers: Black Perspectives on Human Development and Behaviour

Psychology for Social Workers: Black Perspectives on Human Development and Behaviour

Psychology for Social Workers: Black Perspectives on Human Development and Behaviour

Synopsis

Social work education has recently undergone major changes, with anti-discriminatory practice being a high priority area in professional training. Psychology for Social Workersprovides an introductory text which will help qualifying and practising social workers to:

  • understand and counteract the impact of discrimination;
  • work in an ethnically sensitive way;
  • demonstrate an awareness of ways to combat both individual and institutional racism through anti-racist practice.

Drawing together research material and literature on black perspectives in human development and behaviour from North America and Britain, it provides a starting point that will inspire discussion and debate in the social work field and will generate future theoretical and research questions. Among the topics covered are black perspectives in group work and the family, identity development and academic achievement in black children, and mental health issues in relation to black people.

Updated throughout to cover recent legislation, this second edition is an essential introductory text for all social workers in training and practice and for their teachers and trainers.

Excerpt

During the late 1980s, social work education in Britain ‘became increasingly aware of the impact of oppression and discrimination on clients and communities’ (Thompson, 2001: 1). For example, the Central Council for the Education and Training of Social Workers (CCETSW) requirements for the Diploma in Social Work award attached a high priority to an anti-discriminatory approach in college and placement teaching and assessment. (see Central Council for Education and Training in Social Work Paper 30, 1991a).

However, CCETSW’s anti-racist initiative ‘came under scrutiny and hostility from a range of groups [including] the media, government and from inside the [social work] profession itself’ (Penketh, 2000: 123). But, recent evidence of institutional racism, e.g. the Stephen Lawrence Inquiry (Macpherson, 1999), highlights the need for a com mitment to anti-racist practice (Penketh, 2000). The Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000 was introduced as an effort to combat institu tional racism. The Act:

requires named public authorities to review their policies and
procedures; to remove discrimination and the possibility of dis
crimination; and to actively promote race equality’. Anti-racist
social work ‘opened attention to other forms of discrimination,
and contributed to anti-discriminatory practice becoming part of
the fabric of social work education and practice

(Graham, 2007: 3)

The term ‘black’ in this book has been used to describe people from South Asian, African and Caribbean backgrounds. While it is necessary to emphasize the heterogeneity of black people, of equal importance is the consideration of how black people in Britain differ from the white group. The three main areas in which the experience of black people in . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.