Raising the Achievement of All Pupils within an Inclusive Setting: Practical Strategies for Developing Best Practice

Raising the Achievement of All Pupils within an Inclusive Setting: Practical Strategies for Developing Best Practice

Raising the Achievement of All Pupils within an Inclusive Setting: Practical Strategies for Developing Best Practice

Raising the Achievement of All Pupils within an Inclusive Setting: Practical Strategies for Developing Best Practice

Synopsis

Schools everywhere are concerned with raising standards according to government requirements, particularly for those pupils who could be termed 'more able'. The key challenges revolve around government initiatives such as Every Child Matters, independent learning, inclusion and differentiation, thus making learning effective and successful for all pupils.

The authors of this highly engaging book carried out extensive analysis of 12 key schools, selected for their representation of common challenging educational circumstances including working with children from:

  • Multi-lingual and multi-ethnic communities
  • Low socio-economic and disadvantaged communities
  • Small rural schools and big inner city communities
  • Schools with high levels of special educational needs

All the case-study schools subscribe to the educational ethos of creating an environment for all pupils to discover their gifts and talents, and the authors show clearly how these findings can be applied in any school.

Raising the Achievement of All Pupils Within an Inclusive Setting describes the strategies that have been developed to provide equal opportunities for all pupils, whilst accommodating different individual needs and rates of development. A major focus is on identifying and resolving underachievement in schools.

Drawing upon intensive interviews with staff, pupils, parents and governors, the authors provide practical guidance for successfully raising motivation, achievement and educational standards in any school environment.

Teachers, Gifted and Talented Co-ordinators and school leaders seeking guidance and inspiration from real-life schools will benefit from the down-to-earth, achievable advice offered in this book.

Excerpt

In the first chapter, Belle Wallace examines the differences between the concepts of achievement and attainment and then discusses the possible causes of underachievement. She suggests a Typology of Underachievement that, although slanted towards more able pupils, applies equally to all pupils when the school seeks to discover and celebrate all pupils’ gifts across the wide spectrum of multiple capacities. The chapter also highlights some of the successful strategies used by the schools in the original case-study research. (See Raising the Achievement of Able, Gifted and Talented Pupils within an Inclusive School Framework. Copies of this summary can be obtained from publications@nace.co.uk.)

In Chapter 2, Sue Leyden discusses the importance of the development of positive self-concept and maintains that the social and emotional needs of children and young people should be at the very heart of educational thinking. She strongly argues that children who are unhappy or unsettled do not flourish in school and are unlikely to make best use of their learning experiences, and most probably will underachieve. The chapter examines the key factors that underpin successful social, emotional and personal development, with a special reference to potential high flyers. Sue threads the chapter with case studies that illustrate the causes of underachievement of some able learners.

Diane Montgomery concentrates on exploring the syndrome of dual or double exceptionality (2E) in Chapter 3, the term which is used to describe those learners who are potentially very able or who have a special gift in a performance or skill area, but who also have a special educational need (SEN) such as dyslexia, or ADHD. Her major theme is that in many potentially able learners with special educational needs, the potential ‘gift’ is ‘masked’. Diane outlines strategies that help teachers to recognise and alleviate underachievement of these learners.

Chapter 4 examines the concept of challenge that is clearly vital in supporting all children and keeping them motivated in school. Carrie Winstanley considers the question of the nature of challenge and how teachers can ensure that learners are engaged in activities they find personally . . .

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