Behavioral Interventions in Schools: A Response-to-Intervention Guidebook

Behavioral Interventions in Schools: A Response-to-Intervention Guidebook

Behavioral Interventions in Schools: A Response-to-Intervention Guidebook

Behavioral Interventions in Schools: A Response-to-Intervention Guidebook

Synopsis

Contents: Introduction to Positive Behavior Supports and Response to Intervention for Behavior. Building the School-based Problem-solving Team. Part I: Tier I. Understanding Positive Behavior Support. School-wide Prevention. Preventing Classroom Misbehaviors. Implementing a School-wide Token Economy. Making Office Discipline Referrals Work. Identifying School-wide Problems. Identifying Class-wide Problems. Part II: Tier II. Identifying Students for Tier II Interventions. Providing Interventions for Students at Tier II. Part III: Tier III. Understanding the Function of Behavior. Creating Individualized Behavior Plans. Appendices A: List of Forms. Appendices B: Intervention Coach Cards. Appendices C: Tracking Office Discipline Referrals Using Excel. Appendices D: Ways to Reward Kids. Appendices E: List of Inservice Topics.

Excerpt

Imagine a school—whether it be a large urban elementary or a small rural country school. The faculty and staff are hardworking, putting in a tremendous amount of time and effort to guarantee the safety and educational growth of the students. Like most schools, some of the students are eager to learn, whereas some seem as though they would prefer to be elsewhere. Though unmotivated and poorly supported students are familiar to most professional educators, many teachers and administrators are frustrated by students who present as defiant and have difficulty meeting behavioral expectations. Susan’s story provides a glimpse into a school discipline system that inadvertently increases behavior problems.

SUSAN’S STORY

At the elementary school last month, a fourth grader named Susan came to the attention of the discipline office. Susan had not been in much trouble in the past; in fact, she was described by her teachers as a quiet and unassuming girl. Breaking from her historic nondisruptive behavioral pattern, Susan had been in three fights in the last 2 weeks and sent to the principal’s office 10 times in the last month, all related to aggressive acting-out behavior. The teachers wondered at the sudden and dramatic change in Susan’s behavior. When the school counselor interviewed Susan and her parents, there was no indication of significant concerns outside of school. However, the counselor did uncover some pertinent information.

Susan has often been teased by classmates about her body weight, physical conditioning, and coordination. When the class engaged in competitive team sports, Susan was often the last student picked. One month ago, while playing basketball during physical education (P.E.) class, Susan inadvertently . . .

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