Violence against Women: Vulnerable Populations

Violence against Women: Vulnerable Populations

Violence against Women: Vulnerable Populations

Violence against Women: Vulnerable Populations

Synopsis

Violence Against Women: Vulnerable Populations investigates under-researched and underserved groups of women who are particularly vulnerable to violent victimization from an intimate male partner. In the past, there has been an understandable reluctance to address this issue to avoid stereotyping vulnerable groups of women. However, developments in the field, particularly intersectionality theory, which recognizes women's diversity in experiences of violence, suggest that the time has come to make the study of violence in vulnerable populations a new sub-field in the area.

As the first book of its kind, Violence Against Women: Vulnerable Populations identifies where violence on vulnerable populations fits within the field, develops a method for studying vulnerable populations, and brings vital new knowledge to the field through the analysis of original data (from three large-scale representative surveys) on eight populations of women who are particularly vulnerable to violence.

Excerpt

Violence Against Women: Vulnerable Populations skilfully utilizes three compelling Canadian data sets—the 1993 Violence Against Women Survey and the 1999 and 2004 General Social Survey—to present a comprehensive statistical analysis of the contours of violent victimization against women by an intimate male partner. Drawing on a decade-long award-winning programme of research and adopting an intersectionality approach, this book directs sustained empirical attention to special populations of women—those who are cohabitating, separated/divorced, in stepfamilies, living in rental housing, and living in rural settings as well as Aboriginal women, immigrant women, and women with disabilities—who are uniquely vulnerable with respect to risk. By focusing analytic attention on these groups of women on their own terms and by making comparisons across these groups, this book provides much-needed “fundamental statistics” on violence against women and it puts these empirical facts in service to theorizing. Throughout, Brownridge is attentive to patterns and trends as well as nuances and particularities, all the while making a compelling case that the study of vulnerable populations deserves a place in the extant violence against women literature. He does so without falling prey to invoking and reifying stereotypes that surround women in these populations or simplifying the complicated nature of violence against women. Instead, Violence Against Women sheds insight into the processes and structures that surround this type of human suffering. And it does so in a way that ensures we better understand violence against women as a social problem, including implications for prevention and intervention.

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