Disabled Children: Contested Caring, 1850-1979

Disabled Children: Contested Caring, 1850-1979

Disabled Children: Contested Caring, 1850-1979

Disabled Children: Contested Caring, 1850-1979

Synopsis

This volume of essays attempts to identify the shared experiences of disabled children and examine the key debates about their care and control. The essays follow a chronological progression while focusing on the practices in a number of different countries.

Excerpt

Anne Borsay and Pamela Dale

The essays in this volume span many countries and different time periods, but they are united by a common set of approaches to childhood disability. These stem from seeing experiences as the outcome of personal circumstances and social structures, and offer an experiential critique of the dominant ‘social model’ originating in disability studies and developed within materialist histories of disability. The ‘social model’ tends to emphasize ‘disabling’ factors contributing to the exclusion of disabled people from the mainstream of society and contrasts with ‘individual models of disability’ that rely on notions of personal impairment. The intention of this volume is to develop a sense of contested caring. Rather than concentrate on the role of institutional factors contributing to disability the focus is on exploring how they shaped experiences of childhood disability in a variety of complex, unpredictable and sometimes contraed children’s services could present themselves as modern and progressive (Chapter 9), while ‘slow adopters’ had to excuse and overcome their own ‘backwardness’ (Chapter 3). Most important for this volume, whether ‘modern’ or ‘backward’, these varied and changing . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.