The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

The Faerie Queene

Synopsis

The Faerie Queene is a scholarly masterpiece that has influenced, inspired, and challenged generations of writers, readers and scholars since its completion in 1596. Hamilton's edition is itself, a masterpiece of scholarship and close reading. It is now the standard edition for all readers of Spenser. The entire work is revised, and the text of The Faerie Queene itself has been freshly edited, the first such edition since the 1930s.

This volume also contains additional original material, including a letter to Raleigh, commendatory verses and dedicatory sonnets, chronology of Spenser's life and works and provides a compilation of list of characters and their appearances in The Faerie Queene

Excerpt

Whatever of value may be found in my annotations and commentary on The Faerie Queene is a testimony to twentieth-century Spenser criticism, a full and rich banquet from which, as the many references indicate, I have attempted to pick up as many crumbs as limited space and time afford. I am much indebted to the advice of old friends, even where I have failed to follow it, chiefly A. Kent Hieatt, Donald Cheney, Carol V. Kaske, Judith H. Anderson, Alastair Fowler, and Shohachi Fukuda. I am indebted also to many new friends among the critics cited in the Bibliography with whom I have corresponded extensively by email. To list a few of them in alphabetical order: Catherine Bates for clarifying my commentary on the dance of the Graces; Richard J. Berleth for explaining Spenser’s chronographs; Kenneth Borris for sending me his doctoral dissertation on Book VI and for responding to my commentary on several cantos of Book VI; Jean R. Brink for advice on the Chronology; Douglas Brooks-Davies for his learned commentary on Books I and II; Donald Bruce for information on Spenser’s life in London; Colin Burrow for clarifying Spenser’s use of Ovid; Terence Clifford-Amos for information on the poem’s English setting; John E. Curran for information on Spenser’s use of the chronicles; Walter R. Davis for general help with the commentary; A. Leigh DeNeef for reviewing my commentary on the Letter to Raleigh; Michael F.N. Dixon for sharing his knowledge of Spenser’s use of rhetoric; John Downie, with Norman Zacour, for solving my computer problems expeditiously; Wayne Erickson for information on the geography of The Faerie Queene; Andrew Hadfield for making me realize the importance of Spenser’s life in Ireland; William M. Hamlin for advice on Spenser and the New World; Mark A. Heberle for commenting on the Introduction; Ronald Arthur Horton for his exposition of the virtues; Anthea Hume for commenting on the Introduction; Sean Kane for explaining Spenser’s use of the homilies; Ross Kilpatrick for patiently and thoroughly vetting my Greek; Jeffrey Knapp for advice on Spenser and the New World; Masaru Kosako for advice on Spenser’s use of rhyme; Theresa M. Krier for general advice on my commentary; Kenneth J. Larsen for information on Spenser’s use of the Book of Common Prayer; F.J. Levy for advice on the Commendatory Verses; George M. Logan for aiding my research when he was Head of the Queen’s English Department; Ruth Samson Luborsky for help with the 1590 woodcut; Willy Maley for help with the Chronology, and all matters Scottish; Richard Mallette for commenting on the Introduction; Lawrence Manley for help on the topography of London; John Manning for his careful review of the annotations to the first Longman edition; Steven W. May for . . .

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