Climate Change and Agriculture in Africa: Impact Assessment and Adaptation Strategies

Climate Change and Agriculture in Africa: Impact Assessment and Adaptation Strategies

Climate Change and Agriculture in Africa: Impact Assessment and Adaptation Strategies

Climate Change and Agriculture in Africa: Impact Assessment and Adaptation Strategies

Synopsis

'This is a well researched, thorough and impressive work on climate change and agriculture in Africa. I recommend it to students, researchers and practitioners working on climate change issues'Jabavu Clifford Nkomo, senior programme specialist, IDRCThis landmark book encompasses a comprehensive assessment of the potential economic impacts of future climate change, and the value of adaptation measures in Africa for different zones, regions, countries and farm types.Researchers developed and applied multiple analytical procedures to assess quantitatively how climate affects current agricultural systems in Africa, enabling them to predict how these systems may be affected in the future by climate change under various global warming scenarios, and suggesting what role adaptation could play. The study is the first to combine spatially referenced household survey data with climatic data at both national and international levels. This book provides vital knowledge about the impacts of climate change on Africa, serving as a guide to policy intervention strategies and investment in adaptation measures. It makes a major contribution to the analysis of climate change impacts and developing adaptation strategies, especially in the highly vulnerable farming communities in the developing world.Published with CEEPA and supported by the World Bank.

Excerpt

This book presents a synthesis of the findings reported in a number of individual papers produced as a special series of the CEEPA Discussion Papers (www.ceepa.co.za/climate_change/index.html). They are the result of multicountry research activities conducted under the GEF-funded project: ‘Climate, Water and Agriculture: Impacts on and Adaptation of Agro-ecological Systems in Africa’. The main goal of the project was to develop multipliable analytical methods and procedures to assess quantitatively how climate affects current agricultural systems in Africa, predict how these systems may be affected in the future by climate change under various global warming scenarios, and suggest what role adaptation could play. The project has been implemented in 11 countries: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Ghana, Niger and Senegal in western Africa; Egypt in northern Africa; Ethiopia and Kenya in eastern Africa; and South Africa, Zambia and Zimbabwe in southern Africa. The study countries covered all key agroclimatic zones and farming systems in Africa. This is the first analysis of climate impacts and adaptation in the Africa continent of such scale, and the first in the world to combine cross-country, spatially referenced survey and climatic data for conducting this type of analysis.

The analyses reported in this series focus mainly on quantitative assessment of the economic impacts of climate change on agriculture and the farming communities in Africa, based on both the cross sectional (Ricardian) method and crop response simulation modelling. The cross sectional analysis also allowed for assessing the possible role of adaptation. Moreover, the project employed river-basin hydrology modelling to generate additional climate attributes for the impact assessment and climate scenario analyses such as surface runoff and stream flow for all districts in the study countries.

CEEPA coordinated all project activities in close collaboration with many agencies in the involved countries, the Agriculture and Rural Development (ARD) Department and the Development Economics Research Group (DECRG) of the World Bank, the WBI, FAO, Yale University, the University of Colorado and IWMI.

All opinions presented in this book and any errors in it are those of the authors and do not represent the opinion of any of the above listed agencies.

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