Exposure Treatments for Anxiety Disorders: A Practioner's Guide to Concepts, Methods, and Evidence-Based Practice

Exposure Treatments for Anxiety Disorders: A Practioner's Guide to Concepts, Methods, and Evidence-Based Practice

Exposure Treatments for Anxiety Disorders: A Practioner's Guide to Concepts, Methods, and Evidence-Based Practice

Exposure Treatments for Anxiety Disorders: A Practioner's Guide to Concepts, Methods, and Evidence-Based Practice

Synopsis

Exposure Treatments for Anxiety Disorders is a unique volume, as it draws together the latest research on the rapidly-expanding field of anxiety disorders and illuminates how to correctly apply the proven methodology of behavioral therapy techniques to the variety of situations that face today's mental health professional. That said, cognitive therapy has in the last 10 years gotten increased attention as an alternative to behavior therapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders. But while it is gaining acceptance among practitioners, cognitive therapy has yet to illustrate substantial benefits above those that behavior therapy can already provide. In light of the aforementioned, coupled with the pressure many practitioners feel from managed care paradigms and shrinking healthcare coverage, this book will be a welcome resource allowing for increased clarity of action, accountability, and ultimately, positive client outcome. Each chapter is designed to address pivotal aspects in the assessment, formulation and diagnosis, and treatment of anxiety disorders, to a sufficient depth that the generalist practitioner will be comfortable using this book as a guide when working with the anxiety disordered client.

Excerpt

Once upon a time, there was a practitioner who discovered he had turned into a believer.

I used to t healing connections. I was partially mistaken. Instead, I came to see that relationship was important, very important, but that it did not seem to be enough for many patients with whom I worked. They needed something else, something more. They needed symptom relief. Without it, they continued suffering. I came to believe that symptoms played a pivotal, if not central, role in the maintenance and worsening of psychopathology, and, as such, I came to see, incrementally at first, but then more and more, that symptoms alone are legitimate treatment targets. New lives can be built on the absence of symptoms, but not on their presence. While still attending closely to connection, I began specifically treating symptoms more and more and increasingly discovered that patients actually recovered, something I had not previously found.

I was astonished as this phenomenon repeated itself time and time again when I focused on reducing symptoms. To explore and better understand what I was creating, I began reading the literature of early learning theorists, and then that of more modern cognitive-behaviorists; it was almost like reading the journals of Galileo or Christopher Columbus. At first it seemed like such heresy, but with mounting successes following application of behavioral theories of learning and conditioning, I could no longer ignore or suppress what I was witnessing. I also began to feel much less like a heretic, enough so that I obtained formal training in behavior therapy. In this life, I now feel obliged to provide care that works, really works, because human suffering, especially when unnecessary, must be ameliorated. Thus these days I have to report I am a true convert, a believer, someone who has “seen the light,” and with this practitioner’s handbook, I hope to share with you, the reader, both theoretical and . . .

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