Growing Up Transnational: Colombian and Dominican Children of Immigrants in New York City

Growing Up Transnational: Colombian and Dominican Children of Immigrants in New York City

Growing Up Transnational: Colombian and Dominican Children of Immigrants in New York City

Growing Up Transnational: Colombian and Dominican Children of Immigrants in New York City

Synopsis

Upegui-Hernández explores how Colombian and Dominican children of immigrants living in New York City negotiate multiple identities, family relationships, and life opportunities within transnational contexts and social fields. Colombian and Dominican children of immigrants had parallel psychological experiences of living among multiple cultures, maintaining transnational ties with family in their parents' home countries, and shared similar identity negotiation strategies that challenge reified notions of ethnic/racial/national identity and identity labels. Transnational ties and involvement among respondents were anchored in family relationships. However, their experiences with social structures were marked by differences in skin color, class, and particular immigration histories.

Excerpt

This book explores how Colombian and Dominican children of immigrants living in New York City negotiate multiple, and often conflicting, identities, selves, and histories. In other words, children of immigrants may feel they are part of two, or more, nationstates/cultures and find meaning in these multiple national identities instead of being tied to a notion of loyalty to only one country. In many ways, the relationship between the country of origin and the country of settlement of an immigrant shapes the context in which immigrants and their children negotiate their social and personal identities. Bringing a transnational perspective to the psychological study of identity negotiation among children of immigrants is important in order to understand how maintaining transnational ties allows them to maintain continuity between their pasts and presents and to be able to forge a successful future. This study is designed to contribute to research about Colombian and Dominican second generation immigrants within the social sciences and the psychological study of migration from a transnational perspective.

For the purposes of this study, both ‘second generation’ and ‘1.5 generation’ immigrants are considered ‘children of immigrants’, recognizing their common experiences of growing up and coming of age within the American school system and culture. Using a . . .

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