The Common Language of Homicide and Suicide: Evidence of the Value of Durkheim's Typologies

The Common Language of Homicide and Suicide: Evidence of the Value of Durkheim's Typologies

The Common Language of Homicide and Suicide: Evidence of the Value of Durkheim's Typologies

The Common Language of Homicide and Suicide: Evidence of the Value of Durkheim's Typologies

Synopsis

Bozeman's work appeals to sociologists, criminologists, psychiatrists and forensic linguists. His thesis is three-fold: to explore emergent themes in suicides and murder confessions, to determine whether Durkheim's suicide typologies might also be applicable to homicide (heretofore untested), and to expand upon the "forces of production" and "forces of direction" in the stream analogy of overall violence to include the coincident rise of both forces in what the author refers to as the stream-flood analogy. Findings support the integrated approach to the study of suicide and homicide. The most exciting revelation in the book is that evidence of the value of Durkheim's suicide typologies were, in fact, present in the language of homicide offenders.

Excerpt

The violent acts of suicide and homicide sadly affect the lives of many individuals in the U. S. and abroad each year. Further, these two acts often remain generally misunderstood with regard to the individual motivations or underlying reasons for the decision to engage in either suicide or homicide. In some instances, we are provided some insight into the individual’s thinking or intentions via notes, journals, or speech to others that may include ideations of intent to commit suicide or homicide. In today’s world of social media, there are many examples found on websites that include individual expressions, messages, texts, declarations of intent, and even the acts of suicide and homicide posted for others to witness. The expanse of television news coverage and continually growing use of surveillance cameras in society today often captures awful images of suicides, homicides, mass shootings, mass acts of homicide, and acts of terror intended to inflict mass homicide and the maiming of numerous individuals. Often, the first questions that arise in the media, law enforcement agencies and the general public include “Who would do such a horrible thing,” “What could possibly motivate someone to commit such an act,” and “What was going on in the perpetrator’s head before, during or after committing this heinous act.” The answers to these questions sometimes come to light after an exhaustive analysis of the event, yet at other times we simply find the answers to such questions unanswered.

This book examines and enlightens research into the possible motivathe findings shed invaluable insight upon the motivations, the thinking, and the underlying reasons . . .

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