The Prospect of Nuclear Jihad in Pakistan: Armed Forces, Islamic State, and the Threat of Chemical and Biological Terrorism

The Prospect of Nuclear Jihad in Pakistan: Armed Forces, Islamic State, and the Threat of Chemical and Biological Terrorism

The Prospect of Nuclear Jihad in Pakistan: Armed Forces, Islamic State, and the Threat of Chemical and Biological Terrorism

The Prospect of Nuclear Jihad in Pakistan: Armed Forces, Islamic State, and the Threat of Chemical and Biological Terrorism

Synopsis

When we talk about Pakistan's nuclear weapons, armed forces and civilian governments, then controversies and uninvited misperceptions swirl in our minds. If we take in the broad picture, we inevitably conclude that not all is going in the right direction in the country; and that is because the army, politicians and the establishment perceive jihadism as a profitable business. They run this business of killings and torture through their proxies. While we study the militarized mind of Pakistani generals and recognize their resentment towards civilian governments, we find more controversies about the role of armed forces and their relationship with worldwide terrorist organizations. International journalist Musa Khan Jalalzai is ideally positioned to present us with a picture of what is actually afoot and what it means for the future.

Excerpt

I am grateful to Mr. Musa Khan Jalalzai who requested me to write a foreword for his book. Mr. Jalalzai is the author of many books, and contributes articles in various newspapers, on counterterrorism and political issues. The present well-written research book that mainly focuses on Pakistan’s nuclear weapons, jihadism and the exponentially growing networks of Islamic State (ISIS). After Pakistan’s nuclear test in 1998, the threat of nuclear terrorism and the proliferation of nuclear weapons in South Asia gained the attention of the international community, with fears that terrorists could acquire materials and gain nuclear know-how. In this regard, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) categorized three potential nuclear security threats: theft of a nuclear weapon and material to make an improvised nuclear explosive device, and radioactive material. Terrorist groups are actively seeking nuclear weapons or material. There are more than 100 incidents of theft or misuse of nuclear material each year. Twenty-five countries now possess weapons usable nuclear material; and nuclear facilities are expanding into dangerous neighborhoods around the globe.

The entire above mentioned are possible in Pakistan as the country’s armed forces have established links with Taliban, ISIS and other extremist groups, in and outside the country. However, there is speculation that extremist elements within Pakistan’s armed forces may provide nuclear material to terrorist groups to use it in India; therefore, the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission and Strategic Planning Division removed hundred of experts. The killing of Pashtun children, men, and women in Swat, Tirah, FATA and Waziristan, by the Pakistan army, caused . . .

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