The Stay Interview: A Manager's Guide to Keeping the Best and Brightest

The Stay Interview: A Manager's Guide to Keeping the Best and Brightest

The Stay Interview: A Manager's Guide to Keeping the Best and Brightest

The Stay Interview: A Manager's Guide to Keeping the Best and Brightest

Synopsis

It's the worst sort of surprise: A valued and seemingly happy employee gives his notice. Can you do anything at this point? Probably not. Could you have anticipated the departure and tried to prevent it? Absolutely. That's where this book comes in.

This practical guide introduces managers to a powerful new engagement and retention tool: the stay interview. Smart companies have begun conducting these periodic reviews in order to discover why their important talent might leave and to solve any problems before they actually quit.

Written by the retention expert who pioneered the process, The Stay Interview shows managers how to:

  • Prepare for the meeting
  • Anticipate an employee's top issues
  • Set realistic expectations from the start
  • Respond to difficult questions
  • Listen effectively and dig deeper
  • Craft a detailed and effective stay plan complete with timeline
  • Assess each employee's level of engagement, predict potential exits, and communicate results to upper management

Complete with the five best questions to ask and sample scripts for different situations, The Stay Interview is the key to a more engaged... and much more productive team.

Excerpt

The concept of stay interviews seems way too simple. Is it really possible to improve your team’s engagement, retention, and productivity just by asking employees what you can do to make their jobs better?

The answer is “yes” because stay interviews address the two great crises facing business today simply, cheaply, and where the crises originate.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the number of employees who voluntarily quit is increasing sharply each year,1 while Gallup finds that since 2000 employee engagement levels in the United States have hardly budged, and they were dismal to start. Seventy percent of American workers are not engaged by their jobs, and 18 percent are actively disengaged. Only 30 percent are engaged, which means that more than twice as many people are committed to avoiding their work as there are committed to doing it.

To combat these disastrous trends we will soon be spending, according to a third study, $1.5 billion each year on top of the other billions we have already spent.3 These dollars are poured into . . .

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