Female Sex Trafficking in Asia: The Resilience of Patriarchy in a Changing World

Female Sex Trafficking in Asia: The Resilience of Patriarchy in a Changing World

Female Sex Trafficking in Asia: The Resilience of Patriarchy in a Changing World

Female Sex Trafficking in Asia: The Resilience of Patriarchy in a Changing World

Synopsis

Trafficking of women and girls for purposes of sexual exploitation across the globe is widely acknowledged as a leading criminal activity. Women of poor countries are particularly vulnerable to sex trafficking. This book identifies the patterns, causes and consequences of female sex trafficking in Nepal, Cambodia and the Philippines. Using empirical evidence this book illustrates the commonalities and the differences among the different countries and recommends that serious attention should be paid to location-specific dimensions of sex trafficking in designing anti-sex trafficking strategies.

Excerpt

Researching and writing this book was challenging on many fronts. As a woman, it was not easy to overcome my feelings of sorrow and anger when confronted with the stories of female sexual exploitation for profit, especially of poor young girls. The stigma of prostitution is so pervasive around the globe that while very few people who are engaged in the activity are willing to talk openly, the most exploited of them, the minor-aged girls are hidden away altogether from all direct scrutiny. Furthermore, there was always the dilemma of how to bring redress to victims of sex trafficking and help bring the offenders to justice while maintaining the confidentiality of my sources. As I rationalized to myself, while female sex trafficking is a sad story to relate and emotionally draining, it is imperative that we push it out into the open from the murky depths of human behavior in order to find strategies to combat it.

There were many people who helped research the book. They came from many parts of the world, including, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Cambodia, the Philippines and the United States. There were numerous NGO activists, government officials, scholars, teachers, cab drivers and students who went out of their way to help me understand the culture-specific dimensions of prostitution and sex trafficking. I thank them all. I am especially thankful to the two series editors at Routledge, Professor Janet H. Momsen and Professor Janice Monk for their continuous support. Kate Drueshel, Maureen Donaghy and Lauraine Maximé, my research assistants in the School of International service at American University enthusiastically collected research material for me and also helped me with the final editing of the draft manuscript. Mevan Samarasinghe not only rescued the draft chapters from computer disaster many times, but also inserted the maps and formatted the document. Dr. Ram Alagan drew the maps and Mr. Vasantha Premaratne converted my ideas into intelligible graphs. I owe each of them a debt of gratitude. I also wish to thank the School of International Service of the American University, Washington, D.C., and the International Center for Ethnic Studies, Kandy, Sri Lanka for their support in researching and writing this book.

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