Baroness Orczy's the Scarlet Pimpernel: A Publishing History

Baroness Orczy's the Scarlet Pimpernel: A Publishing History

Baroness Orczy's the Scarlet Pimpernel: A Publishing History

Baroness Orczy's the Scarlet Pimpernel: A Publishing History

Synopsis

Since its publication in 1905, The Scarlet Pimpernel has experienced global success, not only as a novel but in theatrical and film adaptations. Sally Dugan charts the history of Baroness Orczy's elusive hero, from the novel's origins through its continuing afterlife, including postmodern appropriations of the myth. Drawing on archival research in Britain, the United States and Australia, her study shows for the first time how Orczy's nationalistic superhero was originally conceived as an anarchist Pole plotting against Tsarist Russia, rather than a counter-revolutionary Englishman. Dugan explores the unique blend of anarchy, myth and magic that emerged from the story's astonishing and complex beginnings and analyses the enduring elements of the legend. To his creator, the Pimpernel was not simply a swashbuckling hero but an English gentleman spreading English values among benighted savages. Dugan investigates the mystery of why this imperialist crusader has not only survived the decline of the meta-narratives surrounding his birth, but also continues to enthrall a multinational audience. Offering readers insights into the Pimpernel's appearances in print, in film and on the stage, Dugan provides a nuanced picture of the trope of the Scarlet Pimpernel and an explanation of the phenomenon's durability.

Excerpt

This book covers the Scarlet Pimpernel’s manifestations in a wide variety of genres; in order to limit confusion, I have referred to The Scarlet Pimpernel in italics only when discussing the novel, play or film. I have used plain font when referring to the Scarlet Pimpernel as a series of books or films, as a fictional character and as a cultural phenomenon.

Following Orczy’s own preferences, I have used the Hungarian version of Christian names, i.e. Emmuska rather than Emma, and Bodog, rather than Felix for her father. Her husband’s name, Montagu, is spelt without an additional e, although it is mis-spelt in many sources.

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.