Geopolitics and the Quest for Dominance

Geopolitics and the Quest for Dominance

Geopolitics and the Quest for Dominance

Geopolitics and the Quest for Dominance

Synopsis

History and geography delineate the operation of power, not only its range but also the capacity to plan and the ability to implement. Approaching state strategy and policy from the spatial angle, Jeremy Black argues that just as the perception of power is central to issues of power, so place, and its constraints and relationships, is partly a matter of perception, not merely map coordinates. Geopolitics, he maintains, is as much about ideas and perception as it is about the actual spatial dimensions of power. Black's study ranges widely, examining geography and the spatial nature of state power from the 15th century to the present day. He considers the rise of British power, geopolitics and the age of Imperialism, the Nazis and World War II, and the Cold War, and he looks at the key theorists of the latter 20th century, including Henry Kissinger, Francis Fukuyama and Samuel P. Huntington, Philip Bobbitt, Niall Ferguson, and others.

Excerpt

HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY DEFINE THE OPERATION OF POWER, not only its range but also the capacity to plan and the ability to implement. The study of power in time and space—and, more specifically, foreign policy and military action—is therefore an important element in the understanding of international relations, military history, and the development of states and of state systems. This study is the subject of this book. It provides a significant angle on strategy and policy, the spatial angle, and relates this angle to the changing perceptions of commentators. These perceptions throw light on the understanding of power and the international system. These perceptions also prove an important aspect of the soft power and related practice of acceptance (if not compliance) that are so important to the reality of power, both on the international scale and within states.

Thus, geopolitics, although claiming in some hands a scientific precision, is as much about ideas and perception as it is about the actual spatial dimensions of power. Moreover, the latter themselves are not as precise as they might appear. Indeed, the real, latent and possible, spatial sources and degrees of strength are all open to debate. Certainly that helps explain why the subject of geopolitics is both fascinating and valuable, for it throws light on how ideas have developed and on the varying political resonances of control over space. As such, the subject repays consideration.

History and geography: this book also reflects two linked interests of mine. As a historian, I have always been fascinated by geography; indeed I nearly took the subject as a university student. Subsequently . . .

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.