Return to Reason: A Critique of Enlightenment Evidentialism, and a Defense of Reason and Belief in God

Return to Reason: A Critique of Enlightenment Evidentialism, and a Defense of Reason and Belief in God

Return to Reason: A Critique of Enlightenment Evidentialism, and a Defense of Reason and Belief in God

Return to Reason: A Critique of Enlightenment Evidentialism, and a Defense of Reason and Belief in God

Synopsis

A penetrating critique of the Enlightenment assumption of evidentialism -- that belief in God requires the support of evidence or arguments to be rational. Garnering arguments from C. S. Lewis, Alvin Plantinga, Nicholas Wolterstorff, Thomas Reid, William James, and John Calvin, Clark asserts that this Enlightenment demand for evidence is itself both irrelevant and irrational

Excerpt

We know that God is everywhere; but certainly we feel His
presence most when His works are on the grandest scale
spread before us: and it is in the unclouded night-sky, where
His worlds wheel their silent course, that we read clearest
His infinitude, His omnipotence, His omnipresence. I bad
risen to my knees to pray for Mr. Rochester. Looking up. I,
wits tear-dimmed eyes, saw the mighty Milky-way. Remem
bering what it was—what countless systems there swept
space like a soft trace of light—I felt the might and strength
of God
.

—Charlotte Brontë, Jane Eyre

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