A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880

A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880

A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880

A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850-1880

Synopsis

Historians have published countless studies of the American Civil War from 1861 to 1865 and the era of Reconstruction that followed those four years of brutally destructive conflict. Most of these works focus on events and developments at the national or state level, explaining and analyzing the causes of disunion, the course of the war, and the bitter disputes that arose during restoration of the Union. Much less attention has been given to studying how ordinary people experienced the years from 1861 to 1876. What did secession, civil war, emancipation, victory for the United States, and Reconstruction mean at the local level in Texas? Exactly how much change economic, social, and political did the era bring to the focus of the study, Harrison County: a cotton-growing, planter-dominated community with the largest slave population of any county in the state? Providing an answer to that question is the basic purpose of A Southern Community in Crisis: Harrison County, Texas, 1850 1880. First published by the Texas State Historical Association in 1983, the book is now available in paperback, with a foreword by Andrew J. Torget, one of the Lone Star State s top young historians.
"

Excerpt

When Randolph B. Campbell’s A Southern Community in Crisis first appeared in 1983, the book embodied some of the most important movements roiling the historical profession during that era. in the wake of the tumultuous social and political upheavals of the 1960s and early 1970s, for example, historians had begun pushing hard to recover the histories of everyday people in hopes of telling the past “from the bottom up” rather than “from the top down.” Turning away from sweeping narratives centered on national figures, these scholars increasingly embraced community-focused studies where a groundlevel approach could allow them to explore the lives of people who had been largely left out of the traditional American nar-

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.