Paris 1928: Nexus II

Paris 1928: Nexus II

Paris 1928: Nexus II

Paris 1928: Nexus II

Synopsis

Henry Miller's 'Nexus' was censored 50 years ago, while Miller and his publishers fought for freedom of speech. 'Nexus II' was never published, and relooks at his first trip to Paris and Europe in 1928, a world on the edge of the great depression. This volume collates these unpublished memoirs as Henry Miller wished.

Excerpt

In 1927, a would-be writer, Henry Miller, opened a speakeasy in Greenwich Village with his second wife June Mansfield. That year, he exhibited his first watercolours and, according to Miller, compiled notes for an entire cycle of autobiographical novels in one day. These Capricorn Notes became a resource and a wellspring which the writer drew on for the rest of his creative life. They became immediately useful in his second period in Paris, (1930–1939), when he published Tropic of Cancer (1934), Black Spring (1936) and Tropic of Capricorn (1939) and after that, with the publication of the Rosy Crucifixion trilogy of Sexus (1949), Plexus (1952), and Nexus (1960). This last was completed in April 1959 and published in France as Nexus I the following year. Miller’s imaginative commitment to the events recorded in the Notes lasted for most his life, with the writer revisiting the sequence and its unfolding again and again.

Nearly thirty years after its original publication, Grove Press published the first authorized us edition of Tropic of Cancer in 1961. That same year, Henry Miller, now a writer of international stature, was touring Europe and working on a new book, Nexus ii. He completed three drafts. the release of Tropic of Cancer was keeping his publishers busy at the time, defending the author in obscenity trials in different states.

The new manuscript, Nexus 11, was a reworking of Miller’s first trip to Paris with June in 1928, a journey that had taken them deep into . . .

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