Leading the Unleadable: How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas and Other Difficult People

Leading the Unleadable: How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas and Other Difficult People

Leading the Unleadable: How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas and Other Difficult People

Leading the Unleadable: How to Manage Mavericks, Cynics, Divas and Other Difficult People

Synopsis

Is that one guy dragging you all down? The control-freak, the narcissist, the slacker, the cynic... Difficult people are the worst part of a manager's job. Whether it comes from direct reports or people above, outbursts, irrational demands, griping, and other disruptions need to be dealt with-and it's your responsibility to do it. Leading the Unleadable turns this dreaded chore into a straight forward process that gently, yet effectively, improves behaviors. Written by an insider in the tech industry, where personality issues routinely wreck projects, the book reveals a core truth: most people actually want to contribute results, not cause headaches. Once you realize the potential for change, the book's simple steps, examples, and scripts explain how to right even the most hopeless situations. You'll learn how to: - Master the necessary mindset - Explain the problem calmly in a short feedback session - Get a commitment to change, and follow up - Coach others to replicate the process - Develop the situational awareness required to spot trouble even earlier in the future Every manager has "problem people.' What sets great managers apart is how they turn them into productive team players. Prepare to transform the troublesome into the tremendous. "

Excerpt

In working with hundreds of leaders around the world, I have found that the greater the responsibilities of leadership, the greater the amount of trouble you must deal with. Recently, a division manager responsible for 100 million dollars in revenue and 500 employees distilled the situation perfectly to a roomful of colleagues.

He held his hands a few inches apart. “This,” he said, “is how much good news I get to share with the upper management of this company.” He then stretched his arms the full distance. “This,” he said, “is how much bad news I get to share with upper management.” the other leaders in the room nodded their heads in agreement.

This is why leaders often reach the point at which they wake up one morning and simply think, “I don’t want to do this anymore.” They have reached a leadership crisis point. There is a way forward, though.

Many managers have called me in the midst of this crisis, often ready to hear the most important message of their leadership . . .

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