The Workplace Learner: How to Align Training Initiatives with Individual Learning Competencies

The Workplace Learner: How to Align Training Initiatives with Individual Learning Competencies

The Workplace Learner: How to Align Training Initiatives with Individual Learning Competencies

The Workplace Learner: How to Align Training Initiatives with Individual Learning Competencies

Synopsis

The increasing dominance of distance learning and Web-based training means employees no longer have to schedule a class weeks in advance to learn something they need to know immediately. And with so much learning taking place outside of the classroom, it's more important than ever for trainers to focus in on individual employees. Based on groundbreaking original research, The Workplace Learner gives trainers the insights and tools they need to implement real-time individual learning. Renowned training expert William J. Rothwell explains the competencies of effective workplace learners, and how the trainer can:
- Identify the drivers and barriers to effective learning
- Develop the ability of individual employees to learn
- Target training programs to the individual trainee's level of learning competence Featuring checklists, worksheets, assessment instruments, and other practical tools, The Workplace Learner helps trainers make their innovative programs all the more successful." "

Excerpt

Workplace training is increasingly under attack. Managers complain that training is not as effective as they would like it to be in changing employee behavior or improving work results. At the same time, many workers complain that they do not receive enough training—or that the training they receive is offered too little or too late to be of value to them in keeping pace with today’s frantic pace of organizational and technological change. Younger workers sometimes grade the quality of their organization’s management by the quality of the training and development opportunities they receive, and management all too often is found wanting when measured by that yardstick. Workplace learning and performance (WLP) practitioners—whom I sometimes call “trainers” in this book as shorthand— complain that they are not appreciated and are too often asked to tackle problems that could never be solved by training. Although U.S. businesses invest somewhere in the neighborhood of $56 billion annually on training, decision makers sometimes wonder what benefits they receive from that sizable investment.

Against this backdrop, it is surprising that not more attention has been paid to workplace learning rather than to workplace training. Training is an individualized, short-term change effort intended to equip individuals with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes they need to perform their work successfully and meet or exceed customer expectations. Learning is an internalized change effort that individuals bring about on their own. Life learning helps individuals lead their lives. It is distinguishable from workplace learning, which helps individuals carry out their work successfully and achieve the results desired by such stakeholders as customers or clients, coworkers, organizational superiors, and organizational subordinates.

However, the tendency to focus on training rather than on learning is increasingly out of touch with reality. the issue is that much published . . .

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