Fundamentals of New Testament Textual Criticism

Fundamentals of New Testament Textual Criticism

Fundamentals of New Testament Textual Criticism

Fundamentals of New Testament Textual Criticism

Synopsis

Fills the need for a truly mid-level, quality textbook on New Testament textual criticism

Presenting all the essential, foundational elements necessary to grasp textual criticism of the New Testament, Stanley Porter and Andrew Pitts accurately define the subject of textual criticism, discuss the canon and manuscripts of the New Testament, outline methodological principles, and more, concluding with a chapter on New Testament translations and how to evaluate them.

Part of a coordinated Greek study curriculum, this volume is designed to function as a companion to Fundamentals of New Testament Greek and its accompanying workbook (Eerdmans, 2010); an intermediate grammar of New Testament Greek is forthcoming.

Excerpt

Both of the authors of this book have taught Greek language and exegesis for a number of years — one of them over the course of a career of twentyfive years at undergraduate, seminary, and graduate levels. One consistent challenge to us as we have selected textbooks for these classes is the lack of a book that addresses the fundamentals of New Testament textual criticism and important related issues that is neither too advanced nor too elementary. in other words, we have written this distinctly midlevel textbook on New Testament textual criticism for interested and serious students and with recent scholarly discussion in pertinent areas in mind. Books like Bruce Metzger’s classic, The Text of the New Testament (4th ed., rev. Bart D. Ehrman; Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005 [1964]), and Kurt and Barbara Aland’s Text of the New Testament (2nd ed.; Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1989), or more recently David Parker’s Introduction to the New Testament Manuscripts and Their Texts (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2008), while all very helpful, are far too detailed for the first- year or second- year Greek student. At the same time, books like David Alan Black’s New Testament Textual Criticism: a Concise Guide (Grand Rapids: Baker, 1994) or J. Harold Greenlee’s Introduction to New Testament Textual Criticism (rev. ed., 1993; repr. Peabody: Hendrickson, 1995) seem too abbreviated to us, not providing enough detailed information or exposure to major issues for the student. Paul Wegner’s Textual Criticism of the Bible (Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press, 2006) in some ways improves upon these but, probably due to its focus upon both Testaments, leaves many areas in New Testament textual criticism untouched. Not only were the textbooks with which we were familiar either too detailed or too abbreviated, but we observed no midlevel textbooks that introduced . . .

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