Genesis and Christian Theology

Genesis and Christian Theology

Genesis and Christian Theology

Genesis and Christian Theology

Synopsis

Genesis and Christian Theology contributes significantly to the renewed convergence of biblical studies and systematic theology -- two disciplines whose relational disconnect has adversely affected not only the academy but also the church as a whole. In this book twenty-one noted scholars consider the fascinating ancient book of Genesis in dialogue with historical and contemporary theological reflection. Their essays offer new vistas on familiar texts, reawakening past debates and challenging modern clichés.

Excerpt

In the memory of a conference such as that which ran July 14-18, 2009, in St. Andrews, the oddest things stand out: we began the conference with a concert in St. Salvator’s chapel, a place with dual identity as a foundation of both church and academy, and rounded it off there with Grant Macaskill preaching. We are inclined to remember conversations over dinner, more relaxed chats in pubs, coffee between sessions, the odd noticeable disagreement, academic jokes, journeys to airports, anything but the papers. Hence all the more reason to make conference papers available, many of which have been rewritten in the light of wisdom received by means of those oddest things. All this in the hope they might serve up the distilled essence of the undertaking. Someone — a spouse, a child, a colleague — might have asked those returning, “What was the result?” in terms of good conscience, one could do worse than point to this book.

When one mentions “Scripture and Theology” (and this was the third in the series, after “John” in 2003 and “Hebrews” in 2006) it would seem that the biblical scholars have an advantage: the agenda is set by a book of the Bible, after all. However, one could argue just as well that the invariable component of all three conferences so far, whether on John, Hebrews, or Genesis, is “Christian theology.” the “Christian” epithet is important here, employed in part as a disclaimer against false expectations of some universal theology and in part to recognize and affirm a particular significance of these books within Christian theology. To employ this epithet is to acknowledge that until we have considered the role of these books in relation to Christian theol-

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