The Gospel of Luke

The Gospel of Luke

The Gospel of Luke

The Gospel of Luke

Synopsis

This highly original commentary, part of the New International Commentary, is unique for the way it combines concerns with first-century culture in the Roman world with understanding the text of Luke as a wholistic, historical narrative.

Excerpt

This replacement commentary (the eighth) represents another milestone for the New International Commentary on the New Testament, in that it replaces the first commentary to appear in the original series, that by Norval Geldenhuys in 1951. For that volume, the first editor, Ned Stonehouse, wrote a general foreword introducing the series, while F. F. Bruce, who would eventually succeed Stonehouse as its second editor, wrote a foreword to Geldenhuys’s commentary in particular. Reading these two forewords can be instructive with regard to the evolution of the series.

That the proposed seventeen- (now nineteen-)volume series would “appear with some regularity” is our yet-to-be-realized hope, which now looks to the turn of the century for final realization (Matthew, the Pastoral Letters, and 2 Peter/Jude are outstanding but in process). Whereas the international scope of the series has been maintained, its original Dutch and South African flavor has, with the present volume, now been lost. So also under Bruce’s editorship the intentionally Reformed perspective of the series envisioned by Stonehouse began to wane. the present volume, the second in the series by a Methodist (along with I. Howard Marshall’s Johannine Epistles) is another indication of the cooperative, broadly based, cross-confessional dimension of the evangelical tradition that has emerged in the second half of the twentieth century. But the goal of the series has been maintained throughout all of this evolution: “to provide earnest students of the New Testament with an exposition that is thorough and abreast of modern scholarship and at the same time loyal to Scripture as the infallible Word of God” (Stonehouse, p. 3 in Geldenhuys’s Luke).

Two further reflections from those first forewords are of interest regarding the present volume: the pointedly pastoral dimension of the Geldenhuys volume, and its way of being “abreast of modern scholarship.” the first matter, very frankly, disappeared from most of the succeeding volumes until it was reintroduced in my First Corinthians (1987); and I have urged current . . .

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