Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony

Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony

Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony

Jesus and the Eyewitnesses: The Gospels as Eyewitness Testimony

Synopsis

'Jesus and the Eyewitness' argues that the four Gospels are closely based on the eyewitness testimony of those who knew Jesus. The author challenges the assumption that the accounts of Jesus circulated as 'anonymous community traditions', asserting instead that they were transmitted in the name of the original eyewitnesses. To drive home this controversial point, Bauckham draws on internal literary evidence, the use of personal names in first-century Jewish Palestine, and recent developments in the understanding of oral tradition. Jesus and the Eyewitnesses also taps into the rich resources of modern study of memory, especially in cognitive psychology, refuting the conclusions of the form critics and calling New Testament scholarship to make a clean break with this long-dominant tradition. Finally, Bauckham challenges readers to end the classic division between the 'historical Jesus' and the'Christ of faith', proposing instead the 'Jesus of testimony' as presented by the Gospels. Sure to ignite heated debate on the precise character of the testimony about Jesus, Jesus and the Eyewitnesses is a groundbreaking work that will be valued by scholars, students, and all who seek to understand the origins of the Gospels.

Excerpt

Some of the material in this book was first presented as lectures that I was invited to give in three institutions in the U.S.: the fourteenth Annual Biblical Studies Lectures, 2003, at Beeson Divinity School, Samford University, Birmingham, Alabama; the Payton Lectures, 2003, at Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California; and the Derward W. Deere Lectures, 2004, at Golden Gate Baptist Theological Seminary, Mill Valley, California. I am grateful to these institutions for inviting me and to many people, staff and students, who made valuable comments on the lectures and who helped to make my visits a great pleasure.

Much of this book was written during a gradual recuperation from prolonged illness. I believe it could not have been written without the prayers of many who supported me during that period, or without — to use Paul’s phrase (2 Cor 12:9) — God’s grace working as power in weakness.

Richard bauckham

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.